Yo haber un frio

0
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Yo haber un frio. Is that right? Or do i say it like "Yo haber frio un. Nah dat makes no sence.But how do i say "I have a cold." '''? was i right the first time'Or is there another word for it,like in German.

6090 views
updated FEB 25, 2009
posted by Vilaeyas

20 Answers

1
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"Yo haber un frío" is completely wrong. First, because you don't use infinitives like that (you have to conjugate them). Also, "haber" cannot be used as "I have [something]"; for that you use "tener". Finally, "a cold" is not "un frío" when it means ilness.

Estoy resfriado : used when people have an inflammation and secretions of the mucous membrane, normally causing people to sneeze.
Estoy constipado: False friend!

Tengo un catarro: Similar inflammation and secretions, but generally affecting also the throat or other parts of the body. It often goes along with coughs.

Estoy constipado: False friend! It is a blockage of the nose, not the bottom. It is either a resfriado or catarro, but with a blocked nose.

Tengo gripe: Viral disease with fever, general pain, and other symptoms, such as those of "catarro". This is the only properly medical term so far.

By the way, are there exact equivalents for these three in English? I know you have catarrh (a typical Greek word), but it doubt it will be used in a normal conversation or when talking to children, like Spanish.

Martin Rizzi said:

i have a cold = tengo gripa or = estoy resfriado

"Gripa" is a colloquial for "gripe" in México and Colombia.

updated ENE 11, 2010
posted by lazarus1907
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Exact equivalents? Probably not. In everyday language (not medical terms):

Estoy resfriado. If people just have congestion from seasonal allergies or something like that, but aren't really "sick," they might say: I'm congested, or My allergies are bothering me. Otherwise, we don't really make a distinction. "I have a bit of a cold" is something you might hear, or "I think I'm coming down with something."

Tengo un catarro. I have a cold.

Estoy constipado. My nose is stuffed up. Good luck understanding me. grin

On signs around here (Cover Your Cough / Cubra Su Tos), I believe they translate flu as gripe. This would be the real (viral) influenza, not the commonly-referred to "stomach flu."

I don't think I've ever heard the word "catarrh" in conversation, whether in the street or at the doctor's office. It sounds old-fashioned.

Poster

lazarus1907 said:

By the way, are there exact equivalents for these three in English? I know you have catarrh (a typical Greek word), but it doubt it will be used in a normal conversation or when talking to children, like Spanish.

>

updated FEB 25, 2009
posted by Natasha
0
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ok lol

lazarus1907 said:

^_^ @'''® = £ðvê ^_^ said:

u have got to be kidding......

No, he is not kidding.

>

updated FEB 23, 2009
posted by Vilaeyas
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^_^ @'''® = £ðvê ^_^ said:

u have got to be kidding......

No, he is not kidding.

updated FEB 23, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
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u have got to be kidding......

James Santiago said:

I am cold = Tengo frio

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updated FEB 23, 2009
posted by Vilaeyas
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I am cold = Tengo frio

updated FEB 23, 2009
posted by 00bacfba
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LOL well i am not constipated. Just please give meh the saying of "I am cold" por favorrr

lazarus1907 said:

We are saying the same, more or less, but:Estoy constipado = I have a blocked noseEstoy constreñido = I am constipated"Constipado" It is a typical false friend. James just wrote the right way of saying "constipated" in Spanish.

>

updated FEB 23, 2009
posted by Vilaeyas
0
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We are saying the same, more or less, but:

Estoy constipado = I have a blocked nose
Estoy constreñido = I am constipated

"Constipado" It is a typical false friend. James just wrote the right way of saying "constipated" in Spanish.

updated FEB 23, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
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ok now i am CONFUSED!!! Everyone says diff things....=_=

updated FEB 23, 2009
posted by Vilaeyas
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Estoy constipado: False friend! It is a blockage of the nose, not the bottom.

And in case anyone is wondering, it is "estoy estreñido."

updated FEB 23, 2009
posted by 00bacfba
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oh thank you

lazarus1907 said:

"Yo haber un frío" is completely wrong. First, because you don't use infinitives like that (you have to conjugate them). Also, "haber" cannot be used as "I have [something]"; for that you use "tener". Finally, "a cold" is not "un frío" when it means ilness.Estoy resfriado : used when people have an inflammation and secretions of the mucous membrane, normally causing people to sneeze.Tengo un catarro: Similar inflammation and secretions, but generally affecting also the throat or other parts of the body. It often goes along with coughs.Tengo gripe: Viral disease with fever, general pain, and other symptoms, such as those of "catarro". This is the only properly medical term so far.By the way, are there exact equivalents for these three in English?

Martin Rizzi said:

i have a cold = tengo gripa or = estoy resfriado

"Gripa" is a colloquial for "gripe" in México and Colombia.

>

updated FEB 23, 2009
posted by Vilaeyas
0
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i have a cold = tengo gripa or = estoy resfriado

updated FEB 23, 2009
posted by Martin-Rizzi
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ok thank you quentin

Quentin said:

I think they use the word catarro for cold also, but with tener.Tengo catarro. I have a cold.

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updated FEB 23, 2009
posted by Vilaeyas
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I think they use the word catarro for cold also, but with tener.

Tengo catarro. I have a cold.

updated FEB 23, 2009
posted by 0074b507
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Gosh, my voice sounds like crap...!when i talk to my brothers,they get mad,because they think i am "FAKING" my cold.....=_=

updated FEB 23, 2009
posted by Vilaeyas