secandome

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Lesson 2.5
The example "Estoy secandome el pelo" near the end of Paralee's lesson.
Why is the verb not "secarme"? I thought the gerund of "to dry" was "secar"
I understand the other examples " Va a levantarse a las 7:00" and "Tienes que sentarte" where the gerund"s are "levantar" and "sentar" respectively.

6317 views
updated FEB 16, 2009
posted by Brenda-Daniels2

15 Answers

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Actually these things happen when you use the wrong terminology.

I thought the gerund of "to dry" was "secar"

Secar is translated as a gerund, but grammatically the word is an infinitive. Calling it a gerund has brought our friend Brenda to the wrong conclusions.

So, if we continue reasoning like this: to dry, the gerund is secar....so the infinitive is '''''

updated FEB 16, 2009
posted by 00494d19
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estar+gerundio= (Yo) estoy secándome el pelo

Exactly: gerundio in Spanish!!

secando

updated FEB 16, 2009
posted by 00494d19
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That's what confuses me. In your original reply when writing in Spanish you wrote:

estar+gerundio= (Yo) estoy secándome el pelo

Heidita said:

Quentin said:

.

updated FEB 16, 2009
posted by 0074b507
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Quentin said:

So if I started talking to you about the part of speech called the gerund, which context comes to your mind first- the ing noun or what would be the English present participle?

I personally associate gerund when speaking to an English speaker with gerund (infinitve in Spanish). However, as the form is the same to the -ing form, this is really of no importance as to learning the form itself.

In Spain, The present continuous or progressive is taught: to be+infinitivo +ing

We do not use the word "gerundio" to explain this tense.

updated FEB 16, 2009
posted by 00494d19
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I'm sorry for expressing myself poorly. I understand what you are saying . The reason I misspoke is because the article that I read on the matter refers to the gerundio as the Spanish gerund. gerundio=present participle (English)=Spanish gerund
So if I started talking to you about the part of speech called the gerund, which context comes to your mind first- the ing noun or what would be the English present participle? Do you associate the word gerund with the English usage and the word gerundio with the present participle or when we say gerund you think gerundio? Just curious, I know that you know the difference given context.

Heidita said:

Please refer to my post.I did not say at any moment gerund , I said gerundio. I know that a present participle is different to a gerund in English. That's why I said "verb+ing" form.In a nutshell, gerund is not equal to gerundio.Of course not.The gerund (using English terms to describe Spanish grammar) is, indeed, secar.This is extremely poorly expressed. The gerund in English is equivalent to the Spanish infinitive secar.

>

updated FEB 16, 2009
posted by 0074b507
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steve said:

Quentin said: The gerund (using English terms to describe Spanish grammar) is, indeed, secar.

Replace your parenthetical with: (as used in English to substitute for a noun), and change "is" to "would translate as," and you have a sentence which will be understood:

The gerund (as used in English to substitute for a noun) would indeed translate as secar.

The problem was not whether Quentin knew what he was saying, but whether other people could tell what Quentin was saying.

I had not seen your post , Stevesmile

updated FEB 15, 2009
posted by 00494d19
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Please refer to my post.I did not say at any moment gerund , I said gerundio. I know that a present participle is different to a gerund in English. That's why I said "verb+ing" form.

In a nutshell, gerund is not equal to gerundio.

Of course not.

  • The gerund (using English terms to describe Spanish grammar) is, indeed, secar.*

This is extremely poorly expressed. The gerund in English is equivalent to the Spanish infinitive secar.

updated FEB 15, 2009
posted by 00494d19
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Quentin said:

The gerund (using English terms to describe Spanish grammar) is, indeed, secar.

Replace your parenthetical with: (as used in English to substitute for a noun), and change "is" to "would translate as," and you have a sentence which will be understood:

The gerund (as used in English to substitute for a noun) would indeed translate as secar.
The problem was not whether Quentin knew what he was saying, but whether other people could tell what Quentin was saying.

updated FEB 15, 2009
posted by The-Steve
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In "Barron's Spanish Verbs," Christopher Kendris distinguishes between present participle and gerund usage in English like this. Both end in ing because a gerund is a present participle of a special type, one that is used as a noun. He explains:

"In English, when a present participle is used as a noun it is called a gerund; for example, Reading is good. 'Reading' is a gerund because it is the subject of the verb, is."

He contrasts the Spanish:

"In Spanish, however, we do not use the present participle form as a noun to serve as a subject; we use the infinitive form of the verb: Leer es bueno.

"As a present participle in English, [reading] would be used as follows: While reading, the boy fell asleep," (p. viii).

updated FEB 15, 2009
posted by MJ
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Quentin, yes, you are correct. This is from the DRAE.

gerundio1.
1. m. Gram. Forma invariable no personal del verbo, cuya terminación regular, en español, es -ando en los verbos de la primera conjugación, -iendo o -yendo en los de la segunda y tercera. Amando, temiendo, partiendo. Suele denotar acción o estado durativos. Estoy leyendo. Seguiré trabajando. Tiene más generalmente carácter adverbial, y puede expresar modo, condición, tiempo, motivo, concesión y otras circunstancias. Vino corriendo. Hablando se entiende la gente. Se emplea a veces en construcciones absolutas. Consultando el diccionario, descubrí esa palabra

In a nutshell, gerund is not equal to gerundio.

updated FEB 15, 2009
posted by 00bacfba
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This was causing a lot of confusion in another thread. From what I recall it was from a distinction between what I call the English gerund and the Spanish gerund. When English speakers refer to the gerund they are referring to the ing form (present participle) being used as a noun.

Skiing is my favorite pastime. Skiing in the present participle being used as a noun. (English gerund)
In Spanish this would be rendered as El esquiar es mi pasatiempo favorito.
Therefore discussing the English gerund we talk of the present participle being a noun whereas you speak of the infinitive as being used as a noun.

What I call the Spanish gerund is what in English grammar we would call the present participle. It is the ing form of the verb. The gerundio or Spanish gerund is used along with estar to form the present continuous to adopt your terminology.

Clear as mud? Am I mistaken? That is why I replied that the verb infinitive (secar) is the English gerund if discussing English grammar, but not the Spanish gerund ( secando) when speaking about Spanish grammar.

Now, I'm confusing myself. Let me try another route.

secando to a Spaniard is the gerund. (gerundio). Secando to a English grammarian is the present participle and only is a gerund if it is used as a noun. Int the sentence there is no gerund to an English grammarian, but there is one to a Spanish grammarian. (part of the present continuous)

cite>Heidita said:

Quentin said:

:

The gerund (using English terms to describe Spanish grammar) is, indeed, secar.

Huh'?

>

updated FEB 15, 2009
posted by 0074b507
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Quentin said:

The present progressive

Present continuos or Present progressive

updated FEB 15, 2009
posted by 00494d19
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Quentin said:

The gerund (using English terms to describe Spanish grammar) is, indeed, secar.

Huh''

updated FEB 15, 2009
posted by 00494d19
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Oh Boy, we get to re-visit this terminololy.

The gerund (using English terms to describe Spanish grammar) is, indeed, secar. The verb infinitive is also the form of the verb to be used as a noun.

The present progressive is formed by Estar+ the present participle (English term) (drying)
The present progressive is formed by Estar + el gerundio (Spanish gerund) (secando)

updated FEB 15, 2009
posted by 0074b507
0
votes

Estoy secándome el pelo

We are using the present continuous here.

to be +verb-ing = I am drying my hair.

estar+gerundio= (Yo) estoy secándome el pelo

[url=http://buscon.rae.es/draeI/SrvltGUIVerbos'origen=RAE&IDVERBO=9894]secar[/url] is the infinitive.

updated FEB 15, 2009
posted by 00494d19