Un día prometedor en la historia

0
votes

Hoy, celebramos el día, hace doscientos años (12 de Febrero de 1809), en que nacieron dos grandes hombres, quienes son héroes míos, Abraham Lincoln y Charles Darwin. En honor de su cumpleaños, me gustaría tratar de traducir dos citas suyas. Como siempre, les agradecería cualquier sugerencia que pudieran darme.

"When I do good, I feel good; when I do bad, I feel bad, and that is my religion."
Cuando hago el bien, me siento bien; cuando hago el mal, me siento mal, y eso es mi religión.
- Abraham Lincoln

"We can allow satellites, planets, suns, universe, nay whole systems of universes, to be governed by laws, but the smallest insect, we wish to be created at once by special act."
Podemos permitir que los satélites, los planetas, los soles, el universo, incluso sistemas enteros de universos, sean gobernados por leyes, pero el insecto más pequeño, deseamos que sea creado a la vez por un acto especial.
- Charles Darwin

3496 views
updated FEB 12, 2009
posted by 00bacfba

12 Answers

0
votes

But remember that at that time, the distinction between shall and will was still being observed, with shall indicating the simple future, and will a volition. And it's not just "those who will bear," but "will/shall have borne," in the future perfect, referring to an indefinite point in the future when the nation would have to care for those who, at that future time, have been wounded.

It's a very fine difference either way, since he basically just means taking care of the wounded soldiers, but I still read it my way (stubborn cuss that I am).

updated FEB 12, 2009
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

James Santiago said:

Thank you for the suggestions. Two comments, though. The original says "to care for him who shall have borne the battle," which to me implies that he is talking about soldiers who have not yet been wounded, but will be in the future. That is why I translated it as "para cuidar a él que habrá padecido la batalla." And "borne the battle" comes from "bear the battle," which doesn't really mean "suffer in battle," but rather endure or suffer the battle itself.
To me the "shall have borne" sounds more like a subjunctive that a future. So that, if I were so "atrevido" I'd be likely to substitute "who may have borne" rather than "those who will bear".

updated FEB 12, 2009
posted by samdie
0
votes

Yes, I agree with both of those changes (the "esa" was kindly pointed out by someone privately, and I should have caught that one myself), as well as the rest of Heidita's suggestions, other than the two I questioned.

Thanks!

updated FEB 12, 2009
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

Impressive job! I just found one small mistake: "..., y esa es mi religión." I'd be more inclined to use "aquél" as suggested by Heidita instead of "él".

updated FEB 12, 2009
posted by LadyDi
0
votes

Thank you for the suggestions. Two comments, though. The original says "to care for him who shall have borne the battle," which to me implies that he is talking about soldiers who have not yet been wounded, but will be in the future. That is why I translated it as "para cuidar a él que habrá padecido la batalla." And "borne the battle" comes from "bear the battle," which doesn't really mean "suffer in battle," but rather endure or suffer the battle itself.

What do you think'

updated FEB 12, 2009
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

Sin malicia hacia nadie; con caridad para todos; con la firmeza de lo correcto (sounds strange...possibly en lo correcto'), como Dios nos permite ver lo correcto, esforcémonos para acabar el trabajo que tenemos, para vendar las heridas de la nación, para cuidar a aquél que sufrió en la batalla, y a su viuda, y a su huérfano -- para hacer todo lo posible para lograr y disfrutar de una paz justa y duradera, entre nosotros mismos, y con todas las demásnaciones.

He añadido algo para que sonara mejor. Veamos lo que dice Lazarus.

updated FEB 12, 2009
posted by 00494d19
0
votes

I don't know, but on a second look you probably meant esforcémonos.

Sure did. That was a fingerfehler. I guess I've watched too many Dirty Harry movies.

updated FEB 12, 2009
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

I don't know, but on a second look you probably meant esforcémonos.

James Santiago said:

:

I'm wondering if I should have used the form "de + infinitivo" instead of "para + infinitivo" in the above translation. I have seen that style used in literary works, but it's a bit beyond my skill level.

updated FEB 12, 2009
posted by Natasha
0
votes

I'm wondering if I should have used the form "de + infinitivo" instead of "para + infinitivo" in the above translation. I have seen that style used in literary works, but it's a bit beyond my skill level.

updated FEB 12, 2009
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

¡Bien hecho!

James Santiago said:

No puedo escribir tan bien como Lincoln en inglés, y mucho menos en español, pero este es mi intento:Sin malicia hacia nadie; con caridad para todos; con la firmeza de lo correcto, como Dios nos permite ver lo correcto, enforcémonos para acabar el trabajo que tenemos, para vendar las heridas de la nación, para cuidar a él que habrá padecido la batalla, y a su viuda, y a su huérfano -- para hacer todo lo que logre y aprecie una paz justa y duradera, entre nosotros, y con todas las naciones.Estoy seguro de que alguien podrá mejorla.

>

updated FEB 12, 2009
posted by Natasha
0
votes

No puedo escribir tan bien como Lincoln en inglés, y mucho menos en español, pero este es mi intento:

Sin malicia hacia nadie; con caridad para todos; con la firmeza de lo correcto, como Dios nos permite ver lo correcto, enforcémonos para acabar el trabajo que tenemos, para vendar las heridas de la nación, para cuidar a él que habrá padecido la batalla, y a su viuda, y a su huérfano -- para hacer todo lo que logre y aprecie una paz justa y duradera, entre nosotros, y con todas las naciones.

Estoy seguro de que alguien podrá mejorarla.

updated FEB 12, 2009
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

My favorite Lincoln quote (and one of the most famous):

With malice toward none; with charity for all; with firmness in the right, as God gives us to see the right, let us strive on to finish the work we are in; to bind up the nation's wounds; to care for him who shall have borne the battle, and for his widow, and his orphan -- to do all which may achieve and cherish a just, and a lasting peace, among ourselves, and with all nations.

The solemn register and poetic style here are above my ability to translate, but maybe someone else would like to try.

updated FEB 12, 2009
posted by Natasha