HomeQ&AWhaver it Takes

Whaver it Takes

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I need to know how Is spell, punctuate this in Spanish please! Its for a tattoo piece and I need to be 100% correct on it. Thank you for any help!!

3963 views
updated FEB 11, 2009
posted by Shae

18 Answers

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Shae said:

I like the meaning of this one ~ Cueste lo que cueste"! Thank you for your help!! Is just the first C capitolized?
Under normal circumstances, the phrase can´t stand by itself as a sentence. So, if your thinking "Volveré, cuesta lo que cueste." the 'c' wouldn't be capitalized. if, on the other hand, your thinking "Cueste lo que cueste, volveré.", it would. However, once you start talking about tatoos, the usual rules of capitalization go out the window. For reasons of visual symmetry, I'd be inclined to capitalize both "'c's"

updated FEB 11, 2009
posted by samdie
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Outstanding! Thank you all for your opinions & help. Gracias por sus alludas! Hope thats right...lol

James Santiago said:

Is just the first C capitolized'cueste lo que cueste = whatever it takesCueste lo que cueste = Whatever it takesCueste Lo Que Cueste = Whatever It TakesIt's up to you.

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updated FEB 11, 2009
posted by Shae
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Is just the first C capitolized'

cueste lo que cueste = whatever it takes
Cueste lo que cueste = Whatever it takes
Cueste Lo Que Cueste = Whatever It Takes

It's up to you.

updated FEB 11, 2009
posted by 00bacfba
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I like the meaning of this one ~ Cueste lo que cueste"! Thank you for your help!! Is just the first C capitolized?

James Santiago said:

I like the "No matter the cost" ~ Could you say it again for me please'Cueste lo que cuesteThe verb costar can mean cost in a monetary sense, but also means causing difficulty, as in "Me cuesta mucho hacer eso," "That is really hard for me to do." So in the above sense, it means "No matter what difficulties may be encountered."

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updated FEB 11, 2009
posted by Shae
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I like the "No matter the cost" ~ Could you say it again for me please'

Cueste lo que cueste

The verb costar can mean cost in a monetary sense, but also means causing difficulty, as in "Me cuesta mucho hacer eso," "That is really hard for me to do." So in the above sense, it means "No matter what difficulties may be encountered."

updated FEB 11, 2009
posted by 00bacfba
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Shae said:

Ive also been told "Lo que se tome" (hope its all spelled/punctuated correctly) ~ How do you feel about that?

This one is not idiomatic.

Remember tomar also means to drink and here it woudl mean: whatever he drinks.

updated FEB 11, 2009
posted by 00494d19
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I like the "No matter the cost" ~ Could you say it again for me please?

James Santiago said:

Another option to consider: "tarde lo que tarde." This literally means "No matter how long it takes." The other one I gave you means "No matter the cost (emotional, physical, etc.)." LadyDi's first one means, roughly, "No matter what," and her second one means "Come what may" or "No matter what happens."As you can see, it's not just a 1+1=2 equation.

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updated FEB 11, 2009
posted by Shae
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Shae said:

Ive also been told "Lo que se tome" (hope its all spelled/punctuated correctly) ~ How do you feel about that?

Personally, I hate it. It sounds like a translation. Very unnatural.

updated FEB 11, 2009
posted by 00bacfba
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Another option to consider: "tarde lo que tarde." This literally means "No matter how long it takes." The other one I gave you means "No matter the cost (emotional, physical, etc.)." LadyDi's first one means, roughly, "No matter what," and her second one means "Come what may" or "No matter what happens."

As you can see, it's not just a 1+1=2 equation.

updated FEB 11, 2009
posted by 00bacfba
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Ive also been told "Lo que se tome" (hope its all spelled/punctuated correctly) ~ How do you feel about that'

updated FEB 11, 2009
posted by Shae
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I like "pase lo que pase"

También: lo que haga falta

But I think in the context...LadyDi's sentence is perfect and the shortest.

updated FEB 11, 2009
posted by 00494d19
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OK, with that context you should be able to get some good suggestions, in addition to the three already given.

updated FEB 11, 2009
posted by 00bacfba
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In that case, how about "Pase Lo Que Pase"? Wait for other opinions.

updated FEB 11, 2009
posted by LadyDi
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Umm its our motto. He's in the USMC and when he deploys etc... We always say to each other Whatever it Takes to be together again, get back to each other, for him to come home etc... Its what we say when things are tough or we havent been able to really communicate for whatever reason... We say it to let each other know were here for each other and always will be no matter what! I hope that helps. Sorry to be a pain!! lol

updated FEB 11, 2009
posted by Shae
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It will just be "Whatever it Takes" in both languages.

But the point is that a given set of words doesn't have a unique meaning. "I'm running" can mean I'm walking very fast, I'm trying to be elected, I'm an operating machine, and on and on. That's why I'm asking what you are trying to express here. You'd hate to get a tattoo and then have people tell you that it means something other than what you expected, wouldn't you?

Cueste lo que cueste is one option, but please tell us what you want it to mean.

updated FEB 11, 2009
posted by 00bacfba
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