The "tilde" or "accent mark"

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Paralee consistently uses the word "tilde" when referring to accent marks for stressing a syllable. I've only heard that word used for this "~" symbol. I did a bit of quick research online... and find the definitions across-the-board match with my understanding of the word. Can anyone enlighten me on this'

11770 views
updated OCT 9, 2011
posted by Randol-Teodocio

7 Answers

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There was a previous discussion on this if you wish to search for it.
As I recall, in English the tilde is the squiggly line atop the ñ and the mark over the voewels (áéíóú) is an accent mark.
In Spanish, the word tilde encompasses both.
So when you're using English to discuss Spanish grammar and you use the word tilde you are talking about both marks. If you are using English to discuss English grammar the word tilde is just the squiggly line. If your speaking Spanish and wish to discuss English (French, etc.) grammar you need to use the word tilde and acento (agudo, ortográfico, grave, etc.).

updated OCT 9, 2011
posted by 0074b507
contraction of you are is you're ... your - is a possessive pronoun.
1
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In practice, in Spanish the word tilde (although it is also used for the ñ and other letters) is used mainly to mean (acute) accent mark. In theory, tilde is any sign added to a letter to indicate various things, or differentiate one letter from another.

By the way, the word "tilde" comes from Spanish, and it is etymologically related to the word "title" in English.

updated OCT 9, 2011
posted by lazarus1907
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Wow, thanks for all the great replies. Much appreciated!

updated FEB 8, 2009
posted by Randol-Teodocio
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I think cañon was the example used when I first heard this back in elementary school. Thanks as always

lazarus1907 said:

Apparently, it is true. Originally was written as double n, and finally it was abbreviated by adding a tilde to the first n. The sounds did not exist in Latin or Arabic, and it occurred mainly (but not exclusively) as a result of combinations like ng, gn and ny plus another vowel (e.g. canyon --> cañón).

>

updated FEB 8, 2009
posted by The-Steve
0
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Apparently, it is true. Originally was written as double n, and finally it was abbreviated by adding a tilde to the first n. The sounds did not exist in Latin or Arabic, and it occurred mainly (but not exclusively) as a result of combinations like ng, gn and ny plus another vowel (e.g. canyon --> cañón).

updated FEB 8, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
0
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This is off topic, but I remember hearing once that the tilde(~)on the ñ used was once upon a time a double n, which was then stacked one on top of the other, and flattened to give us ~ over a single n. Is this just a crock of mierda or actually true? This is something I've been trying to find confirmation for for a while, but with no success... most likely a comment on my research skills.
Never send a singing mechanic to do a scholar's job.
Gomer

lazarus1907 said:

In practice, in Spanish the word tilde (although it is also used for the ñ and other letters) is used mainly to mean (acute) accent mark. In theory, tilde is any sign added to a letter to indicate various things, or differentiate one letter from another.

By the way, the word "tilde" comes from Spanish, and it is etymologically related to the word "title" in English.

>

updated FEB 8, 2009
posted by The-Steve
0
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I'm new at this, and you may have already received my reply, but something happened when I clicked and I think I made an error. So, I will repeat and you can ignore if necessary.

I taught some high school Spanish, and all the textbooks I used emplyed the word"tilde" for the mark above the n.

updated FEB 8, 2009
posted by abuelito1947