Has anyone ever heard of the word comprovo?

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I am trying to translate a chorus of a song from English to Spanish for an Easter service. I asked a Spanish-speaking person to help, and for the following line she used the word "comprovo" which I cannot find anywhere.

The line is "To prove His love like nothing else could, God used three nails and two pieces of wood."
The translation I have is (no accent marks used -- sorry) "Como nada mas comprove su amor, Dios con tres clavos y dos maderas."

I know enough Spanish to be dangerous -- that's all. But I know the word "con" is normally translated "with," so that last sentence doesn't seem quite right. In searching for a better way to say this line (and keep in rhythm of the song), I tried using online translations and Spanish dictionary, but I can not find that word "comprovo."

Does anyone have a better way to translate this sentence. (It is from a song titled, "The Cross Said It All.")

3052 views
updated MAR 23, 2008
posted by dora2

2 Answers

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The translation your friend gave you is good. It's poetic prose. You would not say it like that in conversational Spanish,however, it's fitting for songs and you have to remember that things don't translate directly from one language to another. What your friend said literally translated means "With three nails and two woods, God proved his love like nothing else." Very similar to what is in the song.

updated MAR 23, 2008
posted by richard2
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Comprobar is the infinitive form of the verb meaning to prove, but as far as I can tell, it has more of a meaning of proving something in math. I think demostrar would work better..
Para demostrar Su amor como nadie más podría, Dios utilizó tres clavos y dos pedazos de madera.

updated FEB 24, 2008
posted by Cherry