HomeQ&AI get so confused with tenses ella/el/usted

I get so confused with tenses ella/el/usted

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ella/el/usted
Ella translate for me "she". El translates to "he" I get confused as to how Usted translates. I wish I had paid more attention when I was in high school so many years ago

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updated FEB 10, 2009
posted by jamesgv0r

8 Answers

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James Santiago said:

I know there are places in Latin America where usted is used differently, but in the places I'm familiar with in Latin America, usted is used exactly as you describe it for Spain. The difference is only in the plural, where, as you know, ustedes is used for the familar plural of tú, and therefore is simply "you," and not any special form of respect.

Add the west of Andalusia to your list (probably where this funny habit began).

updated FEB 10, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
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A formal version of "you" is common in European languages--German also has it. Generally, to anyone you would address by title and surname (e.g., Mr. Smith), you use "usted" (actually a contraction--from "vuestra merced"--roughly "your honor"--that is why it takes a third-person verb ending), and when addressing someone with whom you are on a first-name basis (e.g., Bob), you would say "tu." This is very culture-sensitive; the trend is for the informal "you" to proliferate over time. The odd thing is that English ditched its informal you, "thou," retaining only the formal (and plural) "you," whereas other languages are losing the use of the formal.

updated FEB 9, 2009
posted by Jaimito-Angulo
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In most parts of America, "usted" is closer to a simpe "you".

I know there are places in Latin America where usted is used differently, but in the places I'm familiar with in Latin America, usted is used exactly as you describe it for Spain. The difference is only in the plural, where, as you know, ustedes is used for the familar plural of tú, and therefore is simply "you," and not any special form of respect.

updated FEB 9, 2009
posted by 00bacfba
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There is no exact word for "usted" in English, and its translation depends on the country. In Spain, "usted" could be translated as "you, sir / madam": ¿Quiere usted entrar? Do you want to come in, sir'

In most parts of America, "usted" is closer to a simpe "you".

updated FEB 9, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
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él is he.

Sara said:

Well... ella is she, and el is he. .

>

updated FEB 9, 2009
posted by 0074b507
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Well... ella is she, and el is he. Usted is the formal way of saying you but in the singular form. For example, a child would use usted for the word you to an adult.
Hope this helps!!!

updated FEB 9, 2009
posted by sara6
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Usted means "you," in the "formal" form. ÿl, ella, and usted all take the same verb conjugations.

updated FEB 9, 2009
posted by 00bacfba
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Quieras ayudar? Yo comprendo completo

updated FEB 9, 2009
posted by Kelli
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