Pronounciation of specific years

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1865 = mil ochochientos sesenta y cinco.

Is there a shorter way to say this?

Ie: dies y ocho ....sesenta y cinco

3197 views
updated FEB 9, 2009
posted by Kathleen

10 Answers

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Natasha said:

Eddy said:

:

I wasn´t querying your clarification regarding the Spanish, only whether you used "and" as we do over here and I see that you do. It sounds so strange without the "and" though.

I agree with James that we (in the U.S.) were all drilled in school to only use AND for the decimal point. For example, "Nine dollars AND fifty cents."

However, nine times out of ten (it seems like), you'll hear "four hundred AND fifty," not the other way around. It persists in spite of our poor grade-school teachers' efforts . . .

Different again, hehe. Here we would say Nine pounds fifty without the "and".

updated FEB 9, 2009
posted by Eddy
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Kathleen said:

Thanks, the "s" in diez was a typo. In the textbooks that I use, one can write the numbers both ways. diez y ocho and dieciocho. I thought this was strange because I learned to use "1" word. I hate these textbooks!

I'm afraid not: all the numbers (integers) up to 30 are always written (and pronounced) as a single word. If you say "Diez y ocho" to someone, we'll probably write "10 + 8".

updated FEB 9, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
0
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lazarus1907 said:

Kathleen said:

1865 = mil ochochientos sesenta y cinco.Is there a shorter way to say this'Ie: dies y ocho ....sesenta y cinco

In Spanish we don't count hundreds beyond 9, i.e. we say "nine hundred", but not "eleven hundred" (or higher). Instead, we always say "one thousand, one hundred". So, the answer to your question is no, there is no simpler way.By the way, number 10 is "diez", and 18 is "dieciocho" (same as in English you don't say "seven teen").


Thanks, the "s" in diez was a typo. In the textbooks that I use, one can write the numbers both ways. diez y ocho and dieciocho. I thought this was strange because I learned to use "1" word. I hate these textbooks!

updated FEB 9, 2009
posted by Kathleen
0
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While we've touched on the subject of variation in the pronunciation of numbers, I seem to recall reading that there was variation in some Spanish-speaking countries with numbers ending in -uno/a when used directly before a noun phrase, such as:

501 personas - "quinientas un(a) personas"

In Mexico, it's apparently always "quinientas un personas" (if you present somebody with "501 personas" and ask them to read it, that's how they'll pronounce it). But I wondered if people's mileage differed in other countries?

Eddy said:

James Santiago said:

1865 = mil ochochientos sesenta y cinco Is there a shorter way to say this'

No. "Eighteen sixty-five" in English is an abbreviation for "eighteen hundred sixty-five," but abbreviations like that aren't possible in Spanish.

Don't know about America, but here in England, eighteen sixty five is an abbreviation for eighteen hundred AND sixty five

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updated FEB 9, 2009
posted by Neil-Coffey
0
votes

Eddy said:

:

I wasn´t querying your clarification regarding the Spanish, only whether you used "and" as we do over here and I see that you do. It sounds so strange without the "and" though.

I agree with James that we (in the U.S.) were all drilled in school to only use AND for the decimal point. For example, "Nine dollars AND fifty cents."

However, nine times out of ten (it seems like), you'll hear "four hundred AND fifty," not the other way around. It persists in spite of our poor grade-school teachers' efforts . . .

updated FEB 9, 2009
posted by Natasha
0
votes

Kathleen said:

1865 = mil ochochientos sesenta y cinco. Is there a shorter way to say this? Ie: dies y ocho ....sesenta y cinco

In Spanish we don't count hundreds beyond 9, i.e. we say "nine hundred", but not "eleven hundred" (or higher). Instead, we always say "one thousand, one hundred". So, the answer to your question is no, there is no simpler way.

By the way, number 10 is "diez", and 18 is "dieciocho" (same as in English you don't say "seven teen").

updated FEB 9, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

James Santiago said:

Don't know about America, but here in England, eighteen sixty five is an abbreviation for eighteen hundred AND sixty five

Yes, this is a difference between BrEn and AmEn. Many people here in the US also use the "and," but it is considered incorrect for formal writing or speech. Very common to hear it, but I can still hear my elementary school teacher drilling us not to use it.

But the main point here is that the omission of these words, while perfectly acceptable in all forms of English, is impossible in Spanish.

I wasn´t querying your clarification regarding the Spanish, only whether you used "and" as we do over here and I see that you do. It sounds so strange without the "and" though.

updated FEB 9, 2009
posted by Eddy
0
votes

Don't know about America, but here in England, eighteen sixty five is an abbreviation for eighteen hundred AND sixty five

Yes, this is a difference between BrEn and AmEn. Many people here in the US also use the "and," but it is considered incorrect for formal writing or speech. Very common to hear it, but I can still hear my elementary school teacher drilling us not to use it.

But the main point here is that the omission of "hundred" or "hundred and," while perfectly acceptable in all forms of English, is impossible in Spanish.

updated FEB 9, 2009
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

James Santiago said:

1865 = mil ochochientos sesenta y cinco

Is there a shorter way to say this'

No. "Eighteen sixty-five" in English is an abbreviation for "eighteen hundred sixty-five," but abbreviations like that aren't possible in Spanish.

Don't know about America, but here in England, eighteen sixty five is an abbreviation for eighteen hundred AND sixty five

updated FEB 9, 2009
posted by Eddy
0
votes

1865 = mil ochochientos sesenta y cinco

Is there a shorter way to say this'

No. "Eighteen sixty-five" in English is an abbreviation for "eighteen hundred sixty-five," but abbreviations like that aren't possible in Spanish.

updated FEB 9, 2009
posted by 00bacfba