El verbo "Acabar"

0
votes

Hola:

Esta frase me confunde:
"Stansted acabó cancelando casi todos sus vuelos."
[NB Stansted is the name of an airport near London, for those who don't know.]

I know that 'acabar' can be used like: "to have just done/finished something", eg, acabo de comer = I have just eaten.

But there's no "de" here.

At first I thought the translation could be:
A] Stansted finished cancelling nearly all its flights.

Which could mean:
i] Stansted finished the process of cancelling all its flights [because there were no flights left to cancel]
ii] Stansted finished the process of cancelling (more) flights [because cancellation was no longer necessary]

On second thought, I wondered whether the translation was:
B] Stansted closed, cancelling nearly all its flights

Which could mean:
Stansted finished working for the day {comma} cancelling nearly all its flights [by way of description for it finishing].

Qué piensas? A, B, or something else..?

Perhaps I should just move on, but it's bugging me.

Gracias,
Martyn.

3529 views
updated FEB 4, 2009
posted by Martyn

4 Answers

2
votes

This construction (called periphrasis) is different from "terminar de", which is "to finish" (plus an action). When "terminar" is followed by a "gerundio", it means "ended up". Maybe I'll write one little article about periphrases one of these days, because people seem to be unaware of their existence, and attempt literal translation.

updated MAR 23, 2012
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

Por favor. Debo decirlo en inglés para estar absolutamente sigura de haber exspreso tan que me parece importante: Please do!
Sería (

updated FEB 4, 2009
posted by Janice
0
votes

I'd seen "to use up", and "to end", but they didn't fit.

Had I seen "to end up" further down the dictionary page, I would have used it, as it's good fit in the context of the rest of the source paragraph.

Thanks.

updated FEB 3, 2009
posted by Martyn
0
votes

It means "Stansted ended up canceling nearly all its flights."

updated FEB 3, 2009
posted by 00bacfba