lo,le,se

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i want meaning,explanation,use of these words in sentenses.

2430 views
updated FEB 2, 2009
posted by safdar-baig

7 Answers

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Also see this post by Lazarus:
[url=http://my.spanishdict.com/forum/topic/show'id=1710195%3ATopic%3A1126028]http://my.spanishdict.com/forum/topic/show'id=1710195%3ATopic%3A1126028[/url]

updated FEB 2, 2009
posted by MJ
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Safdar B, here is another approach to your question. Think

I don't know your first language, but lo/le/se refer back to some noun that has meaning in your sentence, a bit like "it" or 'he' in English. Now, when my 3rd grade students write, they leave out the nouns and just write things like "We got into a big fight so then he gave it to my sister," and I never know who "he" is or what "it" is. So it's a bit of a puzzle sometimes to figure out what they mean, these pronouns. Some examples:

Example: = ¡Yo le di un CD, y él lo adoró! [I gave HIM a CD, and he loved IT - note pronoun comes before vb.]

What if I want to say "I gave it to him'" Well that's one example of 'se.' 'Se' can appear if you try to use all pronouns, because Spanish doesn't like le/lo together, so it looks like:
¡Yo se lo di a él, y él lo adoró! = I gave it (lo) to him (se), and he loved it!

I'm wondering where you got your sentence that you want the meaning of. If you read any real sentence in Spanish - hop on a Spanish site or grab a book - you'll see these pronouns used everywhere. You have to trace back to what or who, and figure out if it means to her/to him, or It. Sometimes 'lo' appears abstractly, like "Yo no lo creo," = I don't believe it.
The other way 'se' appears is as the pronoun "to him" but really meaning "to himself," which you learn with all the Spanish reflexive verbs - se lava las manos, ella se cortó con el machete...

updated FEB 2, 2009
posted by Jmarie
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Have a look at our vacabulary lists.

[url=http://my.spanishdict.com/vocabulary/vocabulary/show'id=1710195%3ATermList%3A1033651]Le, lo , la[/url]

updated FEB 2, 2009
posted by 00494d19
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Vance Moore said:

They are redundant and point back to the subject of the sentence.

They are not redundant: in most cases they prepare the speaker for what comes later, like "it" in English. In certain cases, its presence or omission can change the meaning of the sentence, and in sentences like "Le gusta" it is essential, so... they are not redundant.

updated FEB 2, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
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As for le, les. I leave them out of any translation.

Really? Then how would you translate "Se lo dije" or "Les invité a la fiesta"? In Spanish, as in English, the indirect object is not always explicitly mentioned.

They are redundant and point back to the subject of the sentence.

You mean the "object" of the sentence, not the subject.

Yo Le dije la verdad a mi papá.

Papa is potato or pope.

updated FEB 2, 2009
posted by 00bacfba
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As for le, les. I leave them out of any translation. They are redundant and point back to the subject of the sentence. Por ejemplo,
Yo le dije le verdad a mí papa.
I told my father the truth.

I usually translate lo as "it." Por ejemplo,
Tómalo.
Take it.

Cómalo.
Eat it.

Vance

updated FEB 2, 2009
posted by Vance-Moore2
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(sentences)

Lo veo = I see him/it
Le doy un regalo = I give a present to him/her

For "se", I've written an introduction [url=http://my.spanishdict.com/forum/topic/show'id=1710195%3ATopic%3A1126028]here[/url]. There you'll see some examples.

updated FEB 2, 2009
posted by lazarus1907