HomeQ&AThe conjugation of " gustar"...

The conjugation of " gustar"...

1
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Hola amigos...I know how to use "gusta" and "gustan" in the sentence. but ? dont know how to use gustamos ,gustais , gusto and gustas in the sentences... could you give example sentences related these verbs? thanks.

10924 views
updated Feb 3, 2011
posted by Havva

14 Answers

1
vote

lazarus1907 said:

¿Te gusto? = Am I pleasing to you = Do you like meCreo que le gustas = I think you are pleasing to him/her = I think he/she likes youA tus padres no les gustamos = We are not pleasing to your parents = Your parents don't like usLes gustáis mucho a mis padres = You guys are very pleasing to my parents = My parents like you guysSome books, like Barron's 501 verbs, suggests -for some strange reason- that this verb is commonly used in the third person, and they don't even show the conjugation for the first and second persons, as if they didn't exist. Seguro que no les gusto a los señores que lo escribieron.


thank you very much.. ''m clear now with your examples...

updated Jan 31, 2011
posted by Havva
1
vote

¿Te gusto? = Am I pleasing to you = Do you like me
Creo que le gustas = I think you are pleasing to him/her = I think he/she likes you
A tus padres no les gustamos = We are not pleasing to your parents = Your parents don't like us
Les gustáis mucho a mis padres = You guys are very pleasing to my parents = My parents like you guys

Some books, like Barron's 501 verbs, suggests -for some strange reason- that this verb is commonly used in the third person, and they don't even show the conjugation for the first and second persons, as if they didn't exist. Seguro que no les gusto a los señores que lo escribieron.

updated Sep 18, 2010
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

Wow, it has been 2 years, I wonder what ever happened to Hawa?

Eddy said:

havva said:

Eddy said:

havva said:

Nathaniel said:

It's easiest for me to look at the word "gustar" to mean to please. I know that isn't the real definition, but the usage would be the same. For gustamos it would be something like "te gustamos" - We please you. The idea would be the same for "gusto", "gustas" and "gustais". Does this help at all?

yeah ? understand I'll make example setences like this.. thanks

Hi HawaI forgot to mention, please do not post in capitals, see [url=http://my.spanishdict.com/forum/topic/show'id=1710195:Topic:329558]THE RULES[/url], particularly number 6.

thanks I'll look ...

No problem

updated Feb 3, 2011
posted by Yeser007
0
votes

"Encantar" is also conjugated in all its forms. Just go to the RAE site and check.

updated Feb 4, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

lazarus1907 said:

Some books, like Barron's 501 verbs, suggests -for some strange reason- that this verb is commonly used in the third person, and they don't even show the conjugation for the first and second persons, as if they didn't exist. Seguro que no les gusto a los señores que lo escribieron.


I was reading that on another website about third person conjugation and also for all the other verbs used such as encantar etc think it was referencing the Spanish Academy

updated Feb 4, 2009
posted by harry
0
votes

Janice said:

In the 6th Edition of 501 Spanish Verbs, I did not find "gustar" immediately among the 501 (model verbs) and so turned to the list of "Over 2,100 Spanish verbs conjugated like model verbs" expecting to find it there. I did, but with no pointer to a model verb. Instead the entry read "Def. and "Imp." which I discovered means "Defective and Impersonal". There is such a section following the main section and I found gustar there labeled as "An Essential 55 Verb".

Defective and impersonal? Gustar? Are you serious? Gustar is not personal nor defective. It is fully conjugated in all forms, and it is a perfectly personal verb. I can't believe they can write such crap. Impersonal Spanish verbs can only be conjugated in the third person singular and have no subject, and "gustar" can be conjugated in all forms, and it has a subject 99% of the time. A sentence such as "Me gustan las montañas" is plural and it has a subject.

updated Feb 4, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

For further practise and to support Paralee's lesson, I created a list with [url=http://my.spanishdict.com/vocabulary/vocabulary/show'id=1710195%3ATermList%3A796411]"use of gustar".[/url]

updated Feb 4, 2009
posted by 00494d19
0
votes

In the 6th Edition of 501 Spanish Verbs, I did not find "gustar" immediately among the 501 (model verbs) and so turned to the list of "Over 2,100 Spanish verbs conjugated like model verbs" expecting to find it there. I did, but with no pointer to a model verb. Instead the entry read "Def. and "Imp." which I discovered means "Defective and Impersonal". There is such a section following the main section and I found gustar there labeled as "An Essential 55 Verb".

I don't think we need take issue with the authors' contestation (

updated Feb 3, 2009
posted by Janice
0
votes

havva said:

Eddy said:

havva said:

Nathaniel said:

It's easiest for me to look at the word "gustar" to mean to please. I know that isn't the real definition, but the usage would be the same. For gustamos it would be something like "te gustamos" - We please you. The idea would be the same for "gusto", "gustas" and "gustais". Does this help at all?

yeah ? understand I'll make example setences like this.. thanks

Hi HawaI forgot to mention, please do not post in capitals, see [url=http://my.spanishdict.com/forum/topic/show'id=1710195%3ATopic%3A329558]THE RULES[/url], particularly number 6.

thanks I'll look ...

No problem

updated Feb 2, 2009
posted by Eddy
0
votes

Eddy said:

havva said:

Nathaniel said:

It's easiest for me to look at the word "gustar" to mean to please. I know that isn't the real definition, but the usage would be the same. For gustamos it would be something like "te gustamos" - We please you. The idea would be the same for "gusto", "gustas" and "gustais". Does this help at all?

yeah ? understand I'll make example setences like this.. thanks

Hi HawaI forgot to mention, please do not post in capitals, see [url=http://my.spanishdict.com/forum/topic/show'id=1710195%3ATopic%3A329558]THE RULES[/url], particularly number 6.


thanks I'll look ...

updated Feb 2, 2009
posted by Havva
0
votes

havva said:

Nathaniel said:

It's easiest for me to look at the word "gustar" to mean to please. I know that isn't the real definition, but the usage would be the same. For gustamos it would be something like "te gustamos" - We please you. The idea would be the same for "gusto", "gustas" and "gustais". Does this help at all?

yeah ? understand I'll make example setences like this.. thanks

Hi Hawa
I forgot to mention, please do not post in capitals, see [url=http://my.spanishdict.com/forum/topic/show'id=1710195%3ATopic%3A329558]THE RULES[/url], particularly number 6.

updated Feb 2, 2009
posted by Eddy
0
votes

Nathaniel said:

It's easiest for me to look at the word "gustar" to mean to please. I know that isn't the real definition, but the usage would be the same. For gustamos it would be something like "te gustamos" - We please you. The idea would be the same for "gusto", "gustas" and "gustais". Does this help at all?


yeah ? understand I'll make example setences like this.. thanks

updated Feb 2, 2009
posted by Havva
0
votes

Hi Hawa
I think this was a very good questions for English speakers. As usual, Lazarus clears up any doubt, hehe

updated Feb 2, 2009
posted by Eddy
0
votes

It's easiest for me to look at the word "gustar" to mean to please. I know that isn't the real definition, but the usage would be the same. For gustamos it would be something like "te gustamos" - We please you. The idea would be the same for "gusto", "gustas" and "gustais". Does this help at all'

updated Feb 2, 2009
posted by Nathaniel
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