Yet another nickname question

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Tapatio.You can use this as a nickname,right'

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updated ENE 14, 2010
posted by Jordan

13 Answers

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I'm surprised that everyone seems to think this is an obscure term, because where I live there seem to be dozens, if not hundreds, of products, restaurants, bars, etc., named El Tapatío or La Tapatía. Maybe I'm just more aware of it because I lived with a family in Guadalajara.

By the way, many of the things that Americans associate with typical Mexican culture in fact come from Jalisco, such as charreadas (rodeos), the Mexican Hat Dance, the broad-rimmed "sombrero" hat, mariachis, and of course tequila. Tapatíos therefore proudly consider themselves members of the most Mexican of Mexico's states.

As for this being a nickname, as Sally says, anything can be a nickname, but this word is not usually used that way. However, I can easily imagine a group of Mexican friends that includes a native of Jalisco, who is affectionately called Tapatío by his buddies.

updated ENE 14, 2010
posted by 00bacfba
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Jordan said:

ok


Many years ago (in the 1940's and 50's) there was a bar in Tucson named "El Tapatio." which was along the route we walked to school. I had many hispanic friends - we were all then just kids - but although they spoke Spanish, no one knew the meaning of that name. One, I remember, sometimes tried to connect it with "tio" (uncle) but couldn't explain the "Tapa" And until Jordan just now gave a credible answer, I've gone over 60 years without knowing what it meant.

updated ENE 14, 2010
posted by Ken-Smith
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Sally said:

Nickname = apodo

¿Cuantos apodos tienes Eddy?

1,000,000,000,000 and all bad, hehe

updated ENE 29, 2009
posted by Eddy
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Nickname = apodo

¿Cuantos apodos tienes Eddy'

updated ENE 29, 2009
posted by Sally
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Can it be used as a nickname? Anything can be used as a nickname in my family, but as Lazarus said it might not be understood by others.

updated ENE 29, 2009
posted by Sally
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I believe tapatío/a can also be used as adjective as well as a noun.

updated ENE 29, 2009
posted by Eddy
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P.S. Tapatío is also a brand of hot sauce . . . don't know if that might be connected to the bar / restaurant names.

updated ENE 29, 2009
posted by Natasha
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Jordan said:

Tapatio (mex.)= A native of Guadalajara.
Actually it's a native of the state of Jalisco (of which Guadalajara is the capital).

tapatío

updated ENE 29, 2009
posted by samdie
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That's interesting. There was a Mexican restaurant in a town where I used to live, also called El Tapatío. Never knew what it meant either . . .

I think most people are putting an accent on the i.

[url=http://www.wordreference.com/es/en/translation.asp'spen=tapat%C3%ADo]http://www.wordreference.com/es/en/translation.asp'spen=tapat%C3%ADo[/url]
<http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php't=317666>

Lazarus,did you mean toponym . . . or was that a play on words'

updated ENE 29, 2009
posted by Natasha
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ok

updated ENE 28, 2009
posted by Jordan
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That's not a nickname then, but a demonym (if such word ever becomes popular), like Idahoan or Wyomingite.

updated ENE 28, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
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Tapatio (mex.)= A native of Guadalajara.

updated ENE 28, 2009
posted by Jordan
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"Tapatio" as a nickname? You'll be laughed at in Spain. I don't know about other places. Where does that word come from'

updated ENE 28, 2009
posted by lazarus1907