No le caian bien

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Does this mean " can't have children'" ( lit. can't fall well for them? )

1647 views
updated FEB 18, 2010
posted by Alonso

10 Answers

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"caer" is "fall" but this is an idiom. The phrase means "They don't get on with..as in:

"Los alumnos no caen bien con profesor machiavelli"

They don't get on well with their teacher is the meaning here. Hope this helps

updated FEB 18, 2010
edited by lagartijaverde
posted by lagartijaverde
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James Santiago said:

Birdland said:

"caer" is "fall" but this is an idiom. The phrse means "They don't get on with..as in: "Los alumnos no caen bien con profesor machiavelli"

They don't get on well with their teacher is the meaning here.

I'm afraid you've got this a bit turned around. It should be:

A los alumnos no les cae bien el Profesor Machiavelli.

oops! grin

updated ENE 29, 2009
posted by lagartijaverde
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Thanks for pointing that out.

James Santiago said:

Al Profesor Machiavelli no le caen bien los alumnos.

One other minor point. When referring to a third party by title in Spanish, we have to use the definite article.

El profesor Garcia

El señor Hernandez

La señorita Obama

>

updated ENE 28, 2009
posted by Natasha
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Al Profesor Machiavelli no le caen bien los alumnos.

One other minor point. When referring to a third party by title in Spanish, we have to use the definite article.

El profesor Garcia
El señor Hernandez
La señorita Obama

updated ENE 28, 2009
posted by 00bacfba
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I think birdland meant:
A Profesor Machiavelli no le caen bien los alumnos.

Hmmm, I don't see it that way. S/he said "They don't get on well with their teacher is the meaning here," and that to me means that they don't care for their teacher, not that their teacher doesn't care for them, which is what your Spanish version means.

updated ENE 28, 2009
posted by 00bacfba
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I think birdland meant:

A Profesor Machiavelli no le caen bien los alumnos.

James Santiago said:

Birdland said:

"caer" is "fall" but this is an idiom. The phrse means "They don't get on with..as in: "Los alumnos no caen bien con profesor machiavelli"

They don't get on well with their teacher is the meaning here.

I'm afraid you've got this a bit turned around. It should be:

A los alumnos no les cae bien el Profesor Machiavelli.

>

updated ENE 28, 2009
posted by Natasha
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Birdland said:

"caer" is "fall" but this is an idiom. The phrse means "They don't get on with..as in: "Los alumnos no caen bien con profesor machiavelli"

They don't get on well with their teacher is the meaning here.

I'm afraid you've got this a bit turned around. It should be:

A los alumnos no les cae bien el Profesor Machiavelli.

updated ENE 28, 2009
posted by 00bacfba
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Did they, perhaps, mean they don't like children and, therefor, won't (don't intend to) have them'

updated ENE 26, 2009
posted by samdie
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"They can't have children" would be "no pueden tener hijos."

Just curious, but why did you think the phrase you gave meant what you thought it did'

updated ENE 26, 2009
posted by 00bacfba
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After adding the accent on "caían", it means "He didn't like them".

Caer alguien bien/mal/fatal/... a alguien = cause someone a good/bad/... impression on someone, i.e. like or dislike

updated ENE 25, 2009
posted by lazarus1907