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padrino de torta

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I have been asked to be the godfather of the cake by close friends that are getting married in Bolivia. What is this? What is required'

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updated ENE 26, 2009
posted by Larry-Fellmet

9 Answers

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That is hilarious, thanks for the laugh!!!

Vikingo said:

I'm blaming education. There should be a law.

>

updated ENE 26, 2009
posted by Natasha
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Vikingo said:

I'm blaming education. There should be a law.

Oh, man, that is funny. And living where that -istes/-astes ending is omnipresent, I find it even funnier than usual.

Now I'm waiting for Lazarus to tell us that this is why Iberian Spanish pronunciation is better, because no one would make this spelling error with thervetha.

updated ENE 26, 2009
posted by 00bacfba
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I'm blaming education. There should be a law.

updated ENE 26, 2009
posted by Vikingo
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cervesa gets more googits than cerveza . . . I'm blaming James . . .

updated ENE 26, 2009
posted by Natasha
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"cervesa"'!

Hehe. I'm trying to be like all the native Spanish speakers on the Internet!

updated ENE 26, 2009
posted by 00bacfba
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James Santiago said:

The above site specifically refers to Bolivia, but I think this concept is pretty widespread. At Mexican parties or weddings one might be asked to be padrino de cervesa, padrino de tamales, padrino de torta, and so forth. Of course, it's a good idea to ask for explicit details about what you are responsible for, but I think in this case it is just the cake.
"cervesa"'!
Sara mo ki kara ochiru. (or as you taught me) "Kappa ni kawa no nagare".

updated ENE 26, 2009
posted by samdie
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Maybe I was a bit too skeptical in my last post. It's normal to chip in on wedding, especially if the people getting married aren't too well off financially. So if they're close friends of yours, the link James gave you is great.

Saludos smile

updated ENE 26, 2009
posted by Vikingo
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See the following and search for the term: http://marybolivia.blogspot.com/2005/11/quechua-wedding.html

The above site specifically refers to Bolivia, but I think this concept is pretty widespread. At Mexican parties or weddings one might be asked to be padrino de cervesa, padrino de tamales, padrino de torta, and so forth. Of course, it's a good idea to ask for explicit details about what you are responsible for, but I think in this case it is just the cake.

Look on the bright side. You don't have to shop for a gift. wink

updated ENE 26, 2009
posted by 00bacfba
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From what I've gathered from some friends on IRC, they're asking if you could pay for the cake. It could also mean to pay for more than that, so look out. You're the only one who could make the call, and maybe it's just a joke, who knows. Don't pay for anything would be my advice, but there's one born every minute, they say.

Suerte smile

updated ENE 26, 2009
posted by Vikingo
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