can somebody please explain the difference between

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me gusta, and
te gusta

1428 views
updated ENE 19, 2009
posted by tom-mullee

11 Answers

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thank you all, I've found the site on pronouns and it looks very comprehensive -now down to study!

updated ENE 19, 2009
posted by tom-mullee
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I know me gusta is "I like" and to say I don't like,
you say no me gusta.

I know that's not what you asked, but i just thought I'd throw that in.

updated ENE 19, 2009
posted by Maria-Russell
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LOL, tiene razon.

lazarus1907 said:

Some of the reflexive pronouns? ALL OF THEM! Truly reflexive pronouns are either direct or indirect pronouns. I don't know any exception to this rule. A reflexive pronoun is that where the object matches the subject, but this object can be both direct or indirect.

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updated ENE 19, 2009
posted by MJ
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Some of the reflexive pronouns? ALL OF THEM! Truly reflexive pronouns are either direct or indirect pronouns. I don't know any exception to this rule.

A reflexive pronoun is that where the object matches the subject, but this object can be both direct or indirect.

updated ENE 18, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
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Part of the confusion, too, is that some of the reflexive pronouns in Spanish are the same exact words as some of the indirect object pronouns, and some of these are the direct object pronouns, too. This site has a pretty clear and concise reference section listing all the pronouns, and clicking on the links gives more specific info on usage. http://www.spanishdict.com/reference/grammar

Scroll down to the middle of the page and look under the subheading, "Pronouns."

updated ENE 18, 2009
posted by MJ
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Thank you peter! as a beginner I am struggling and I do appreciate any help I can get.
In this instance I stupidly confused Gustar with the reflexive verbs and now somebody has corrected me on this. Thanks again for your help!

updated ENE 18, 2009
posted by tom-mullee
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Me gusta = it pleases me (I like it). Te gusta = it pleases you (you like it). At least I believe it does!

updated ENE 17, 2009
posted by Pete-HKK
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Thanks a lot! I take your point. Can't blame the book-my own misconception! I have learned something.
Again thanks!

updated ENE 17, 2009
posted by tom-mullee
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I don't know what book you are reading, but it is plain wrong: "gustar" has absolutely nothing to do with reflexive verbs. As a matter of fact, you only use it reflexively when you say you like yourself.

You don't have the verb "gustar" in English, but you have the verb "disgustar" (disgust), which is used EXACTLY like in Spanish:

me disgusta = it disgusts me
te disgusta = it disgusts you

So, no reflexive verbs.

updated ENE 17, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
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muchas gracias, as you may surmise I am a raw beginner and I am trying to grapple with the notion of reflexive
verbs in Spanish. any guidance on the topic would be much appreciated!

updated ENE 17, 2009
posted by tom-mullee
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me gusta (I like it/her/him).
te gusta (you like it/her/him).

updated ENE 17, 2009
posted by pisacaballo