Sí o sí

3
votes

I just got back from argentina and I heard sí o sí used a lot but I am not positive on the meaning. Does it mean something like at all costs or something like that? gracias

4788 views
updated OCT 28, 2015
posted by steve2

15 Answers

4
votes

100% correct, James.

James Santiago said:

This is especially common in Argentina, and I don't think there is a corresponding English saying, although of course we can express the idea. That idea is that no option is being given. You are asking someone a favor, but at the same time telling them they are going to do it. Two of the many possibilities in English are "Like it or not" and "No matter what."

>

updated OCT 29, 2015
posted by 00e657d4
1
vote

I was looking for the meaning of "sí o sí" and came across this old thread. I'll post the sentence I found this phrase in just in case someone else looks up "sí o sí" on this site and comes across this thread as I did:

Carolina, ¿ te acuerdas de mi colega griego, Kostas? Me escribió el otro día contándome que planeaba visitar Argentina con su familia y me me preguntó qué lugares debía visitar sí o sí.

Apparently the translation would be something like "no matter what" or "no ifs ands or buts."

updated OCT 28, 2015
posted by malbecblend
come to think of it, maybe "without fail" would make sense in this particular context
Thanks Malbec, nice one.
1
vote

I know that sí means yes in spanish but i think this phrasee means something different than yes or yes, is there anyone here from argentina or south america that uses this'

updated OCT 27, 2015
posted by steve2
0
votes

I have many times heard someone say something like this:
Well . . . we're out of tea . . . so do you want coffee or coffee'

Right, but that is an improvised joke, rather than a set expression as in the Spanish. And while your example sounds perfectly fine, "Are you going, yes or yes'" does not sound good to my ear at all. I mean, I would probably understand it, but it is very awkward. The much more natural wording would be "You're coming with me, like it or not."

updated ENE 22, 2009
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

I have many times heard someone say something like this:

Well . . . we're out of tea . . . so do you want coffee or coffee?

James Santiago said:

This is especially common in Argentina, and I don't think there is a corresponding English saying, although of course we can express the idea. That idea is that no option is being given. You are asking someone a favor, but at the same time telling them they are going to do it. Two of the many possibilities in English are "Like it or not" and "No matter what."

>

updated ENE 22, 2009
posted by Natasha
0
votes

This is especially common in Argentina, and I don't think there is a corresponding English saying, although of course we can express the idea. That idea is that no option is being given. You are asking someone a favor, but at the same time telling them they are going to do it. Two of the many possibilities in English are "Like it or not" and "No matter what."

updated ENE 22, 2009
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

yes, gracias

updated ENE 22, 2009
posted by steve2
0
votes

When I was in Argentina, when someone said sí o sí, it was that something had to be done. It's like how we would say in the US, there are no ifs ands or buts about it. Does that make sense'

updated ENE 22, 2009
posted by Nathaniel
0
votes

It is written correctly (both with accents):

¿Sí o sí?

LadyDi has already explained what it means: they expect you to say "yes" no matter what. It is said half-joking, and it is used in all countries.

By the way, if that Spanish "professor" didn't know how to spell that, he has not finished primary school, because when I was a child, everyone was expected to know how to write that perfectly before 12 y.o. What kind of professor cannot write correctly one of the 100 most used words in a language''''

updated ENE 22, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

bueno, hablé con mi amigo y me dijo que significa no matter what.

updated ENE 22, 2009
posted by steve2
0
votes

no, i remember my friend talking about the spelling of it becuase he used it on a test and he did not know how to spell it so he asked his professors. The one from spain had no idea what it was and the one from chile said it was sí o sí, spelled like that.

christine chege said:

well i think you were taking about si and sí. well the one in with the accent is "yes" and with out accent means "if" but they sound the same.

>

updated ENE 22, 2009
posted by steve2
0
votes

well i think you were taking about si and sí. well the one in with the accent is "yes" and with out accent means "if" but they sound the same.

updated ENE 22, 2009
posted by christine-chege
0
votes

I strongly believe it means yes in spanish.Si = yes

updated ENE 22, 2009
posted by kiki-santiago
0
votes

I think that "sí" means "yes" unless you give us more context or tell us what the situation was.

Marco

updated ENE 21, 2009
posted by Marco-T
0
votes

I'm guessing but maybe it means something like "yes or no" except that you only get to say "yes or yes". In other words, whoever is telling you this really really wants you to say "yes".

updated ENE 21, 2009
posted by LadyDi