24/7

0
votes

...this is an organization that offers support 24/7 to people ...

8931 views
updated ABR 26, 2017
posted by nomi

11 Answers

1
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A native Spanish speaker has replied thus at Word Reference:

"A cualquier hora'"
"De modo continuo'"
"Sin parar'"
Diré que "24/7" en inglés es informal, que la veo también en páginas españolas, y que si no puedes usar las primeras tres, "24/7" puede ser preferible a la frase larguísima que has puesto (que después de todo parece traducida).

''''''''''
The full Spanish phrase would be 24 horas al día, siete días a la semana. But in Spanish, just as in English, if you say just "24 horas al día," it usually implies that the business is open every day, because services and businesses that stay open 24 hours almost always stay open seven days a week, too.

updated ABR 22, 2017
posted by 00bacfba
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Yo creo que la pregunta ha sido respondida de manera exhaustiva, pero me sorprende no haber leido: Permanentemente abierto, que sería la forma habitual en estos casos, aunque cualquiera de las opciones ofrecidas también podría funcionar. En español 24 x 7 también se entiende, pero sería muy informal.

updated ABR 26, 2017
edited by Raff75
posted by Raff75
A mí me gusta la palabra "ininterrumpido"
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votes

Because this concept has been around for eight years since this question was addressed....

I would like to know if

  • de modo continuo
  • sin parar
  • siempre abierto
  • a cualquiera hora

are still sufficient?


I raise the question again because I'm using the phrase to reference the availability of grocery stores in metropolitan areas. 24/7 Publix? No, but many Kroger stores are. I refuse to include Walmart; however, Walgreens is open on Christmas.

updated ABR 22, 2017
edited by Nikkigbsd
posted by Nikkigbsd
0
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In case anyone cares, a BBC News article gives this:

The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) defines the term as "twenty four hours a day, seven days a week; constantly". It lists its first reference to 24/7 as from US magazine Sports Illustrated in 1983.

The man to use it was basketball player Jerry Reynolds and he was talking about his jump shot. This is when a player releases the ball in mid-air, and Reynolds said his was "good 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year".

updated ENE 15, 2009
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

In most Latin American countries people are not in a big hurry. So, it is not a big deal to say servicio telefonico las 24 horas, siete dias a la semana. 24-7 is a Hollywood coinage. The Capital of movie land has give us the stardards of beauty,morals, even when and how to pray. We should slow down a bit and enjoy life more. Please, no more 2/7. case close...next case

samdie said:

Gus said:

hoow about abierto simpre - do I need a letter H on abierto siempre? how about abierto a todas horas? why go American? when a good spanish frase exists.

Granted that the use of "24/7/" to mean "all the time" may be an American coinage, but 24/7 is, if anything Arabic (everything but the '/') being Arabic numerals and it certainly has the advantage of being compact/terse.

>

updated ENE 15, 2009
posted by 00769608
0
votes

Gus said:

hoow about abierto simpre - do I need a letter H on abierto siempre? how about abierto a todas horas? why go American? when a good spanish frase exists.
Granted that the use of "24/7/" to mean "all the time" may be an American coinage, but 24/7 is, if anything Arabic (everything but the '/') being Arabic numerals and it certainly has the advantage of being compact/terse.

updated ENE 15, 2009
posted by samdie
0
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"Esta es una organización que ofrece sus servicios las 24 horas"

updated ENE 15, 2009
posted by Satlite
0
votes

in that case .......
consulta telefonica 24 horas, los 7 dias with an accent on the( I am away from my chart)

James Santiago said:

hoow about abierto simpre - do I need a letter H on abierto siempre? how about abierto a todas horas? why go American? when a good spanish frase exists.No H.The problem with using abierto is that I this organization may only be offering telephone support, in which case I don't think abierto/open is applicable. At least in English we don't use open in that way.

>

updated ENE 15, 2009
posted by 00769608
0
votes

hoow about abierto simpre - do I need a letter H on abierto siempre? how about abierto a todas horas? why go American? when a good spanish frase exists.

No H.

The problem with using abierto is that I this organization may only be offering telephone support, in which case I don't think abierto/open is applicable. At least in English we don't usually use open in that way.

updated ENE 15, 2009
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

hoow about abierto simpre - do I need a letter H on abierto siempre? how about abierto a todas horas? why go American? when a good spanish frase exists.

James Santiago said:

A native Spanish speaker has replied thus at Word Reference:"A cualquier hora'""De modo continuo'""Sin parar'"Diré que "24/7" en inglés es informal, que la veo también en páginas españolas, y que si no puedes usar las primeras tres, "24/7" puede ser preferible a la frase larguísima que has puesto (que después de todo parece traducida).''''''''''The full Spanish phrase would be 24 horas al día, siete días a la semana. But in Spanish, just as in English, if you say just "24 horas al día," it usually implies that the business is open every day, because services and businesses that stay open 24 hours almost always stay open seven days a week, too.

>

updated ENE 15, 2009
posted by 00769608
0
votes

Just a guess but would it be "abierto 24 horas" or "hacer algo las 24 horas del día"

Vamos a ver
este es una organización que hace algo las 24 horas del día

updated ENE 15, 2009
posted by Eddy