HomeQ&Amarquesa, marqesina dictionary

marquesa, marqesina dictionary

0
votes

Listening to a piece about the "mercat de San Antoni", I heard a word which I not only did not understand but which I was not even sure I was hearing "right". So I attempted to look up what I thought I was hearing.

I turned first to the dictionary here at SpanishDict.com where I found the following entry:

marquesa [mar-kay'-sah]
noun
1. Marchioness, the lady of a marquis. (f)
2. (f)
verb
3. MARQUESINA.

*Velazquez® Spanish and English Dictionary. Copyright © 2007 by Velazquez® Press. All rights reserved.
*
I think that there must be some problem retrieving information from Velazquez because I know that verbs end in "ar", "er" or "ir" !!

ps, I found my word..."marquesina" -> "canopy"

4926 views
updated ENE 24, 2009
posted by Janice

7 Answers

0
votes

Well, it's the polite command form with the reflexive pronoun attached. Why it should be that way''? Don't know, but here's what our dictionary says:

véase -> see (en textos)

Janice said:

Aha! once I read your response, Natasha, (thank you) it occurred to me that if it is indeed an abbreviation for "ver", then I should be able to find its interpretation by locating such a "V." in the online RAE and "mousing over" it.

And so I did just that! Véase! Yes, that is what "V." means. But wait, why am I getting so excited here....I am not quite sure I know what "véase" meansgrin

Natasha said:

Janice, I suppose the V. just means ver. I see these entries when searching on amazon, for example: abandono, m. V.ABANDONAMIENTO abarrado, da, a. (Obs) Striped, clouded. V. BARRADO

Agreed, SpanishDict needs to stop "interpreting" the codes.

>

updated ENE 24, 2009
posted by Natasha
0
votes

Aha! once I read your response, Natasha, (thank you) it occurred to me that if it is indeed an abbreviation for "ver", then I should be able to find its interpretation by locating such a "V." in the online RAE and "mousing over" it.

And so I did just that! Véase! Yes, that is what "V." means. But wait, why am I getting so excited here....I am not quite sure I know what "véase" meansgrin

Natasha said:

Janice, I suppose the V. just means ver. I see these entries when searching on amazon, for example: abandono, m. V.ABANDONAMIENTO abarrado, da, a. (Obs) Striped, clouded. V. BARRADO

Agreed, SpanishDict needs to stop "interpreting" the codes.

>

updated ENE 23, 2009
posted by Janice
0
votes

Janice, I suppose the V. just means ver. I see these entries when searching on amazon, for example:

abandono, m. V.ABANDONAMIENTO
abarrado, da, a. (Obs) Striped, clouded. V. BARRADO

Agreed, SpanishDict needs to stop "interpreting" the codes.

updated ENE 22, 2009
posted by Natasha
0
votes

As an aside, do you happen to know what the V. in the askVelazquez definition, entry 2, V. MARQUESINA, stands for? And I wonder, too, why the word is written in all capital letters''?

Dictionaries usually have a legend in their beginning pages, and in the wonderful online version of Real Academia Española de la lengua, one can "mouse over" an abbreviation to see its legend entry. But where does one find the legend for Velazquez? SpanishDict seems to be avoiding the problem by not abbreviating. But that policy seems to have introduced some major errors and compomises the dictionary's usefulness. The challenge for SpanishDict might be to access the legend for whichever dictionary is referenced as SpanishDict's source.

lazarus1907 said:

It is a mistake. "Marquesa" can be a few things: one of them, marchioness, and another one, a kind of glass canopy. If it is this canopy, it can also be called "marquesina".

>

updated ENE 22, 2009
posted by Janice
0
votes

I have happened upon another instance of a strange entry in the SpanishDict.com dictionary taken from Velazquez. Looking up chagüite (yes, Lazarus, I am slowly working my way through the diaeresis list) I found the word listed as a "verb, neuter"grin
......chagüite [chah-goo-e'-tay]
......verb neuter
......1. Swamp; flooded field; banana plantation. (Central America & Mexico) (m & n)
......Velazquez® Spanish and English Dictionary. Copyright © 2007 by Velazquez® Press. All rights reserved.

The entry at askVelazquez.com reads:
......Word:chagüite
......Pronunciation:[chah-goo-e'-tay]
......Meaning(s):vn. (CAm. Mex.) Swamp; flooded field; banana plantation.

The program or procedure to import the definition from Velazquez to SpanishDict has what one calls a "bug" in computer programming.

By the way, I wonder what the "vn. " in the Velazquez entry really does mean'''

updated ENE 22, 2009
posted by Janice
0
votes

Yes, thank you, "marquesina" fits the context of the piece I am listening to, describing a special Sunday market outside the San Antoni market building in Barcelona.

I remember your warning with regard to (I think it was the pronunciation') at "askVelazquez" from an earlier post. But how did "marquesa" end up shown as a verb according to Velazquez here at SpanishDict.com'? After your earlier post I did some more looking and saw that an "a." at Velazquez site was/is being improperly expanded to "article" in the SpanishDict entry. In the askVelazquez origin entry, one sees only "a." to mean "adjective".

I have now now looked at the askVelazquez site to see what may have again gone wrong this time. You will be surprised!

___|Word:marquesa
___|Pronunciation:[mar-kay'-sah]
___|Meaning(s):f.

___|1: Marchioness, the lady of a marquis.
___|2: V. MARQUESINA.

It is clear that, once again, an abbreviation, "V." has been "parsed" and then expanded to mean something different from what was encoded in the original. The administrators or those who maintain the code that performs these retrievals from Velazquez to SpanishDict.com may want to have a second look at how they are carrying out this task.

lazarus1907 said:

It is a mistake. "Marquesa" can be a few things: one of them, marchioness, and another one, a kind of glass canopy. If it is this canopy, it can also be called "marquesina".

>

updated ENE 21, 2009
posted by Janice
0
votes

It is a mistake. "Marquesa" can be a few things: one of them, marchioness, and another one, a kind of glass canopy. If it is this canopy, it can also be called "marquesina".

updated ENE 21, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
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