amagnetic = amagnético?

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Does anyone know if the word 'amagnético' exists in Spanish'

4830 views
updated ENE 13, 2009
posted by Bruce

22 Answers

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I think that saying "el titanio es un material no magnético" is also correct. It also sonds more like technical languaje to me.

updated ENE 23, 2011
posted by 00e657d4
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lazarus1907 said:

Bruce said:

Would it be acceptable to say : "Ligero, fuerte, no magnético, muy resistente a la corrosión, confortable sobre la muñeca, e hipoalergénico, el titanio es un metal que atrae mucho, tanto estéticamente como ténicamente.

I knew the rule that when two -mente adverbs are separated by "y" the first takes the adjectival form, but I hadn't learned that the same applies with tanto/como. Thanks for pointing that out!

And it was just oversight that I didn't add that article...

updated ENE 13, 2009
posted by 00bacfba
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Bruce said:

Yes, the prefix 'a', like amoral and anormal

"Anormal" would be an abnormal spelling, but I get your point.

updated ENE 13, 2009
posted by 00bacfba
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Bruce said:

Would it be acceptable to say : "Ligero, fuerte, no magnético, muy resistente a la corrosión, confortable sobre la muñeca, e hipoalergénico, el titanio es un metal que atrae mucho, tanto estéticamente como ténicamente.

Now at least it is correct, although I would have said "cómodo de llevar" or something like that, rather than "confortable sobre la muñeca", which sounds odd.

updated ENE 13, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
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Yes, the prefix 'a', like amoral and anormal

updated ENE 13, 2009
posted by Bruce
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Of course I meant PREFIX . . . ARGH . . . .

Thanks James

Natasha said:

I assume that a- is being used as a suffix here (not the separate French word), as in amoral.

Zoltán said:

Should the word amagnetic be á magnetic?

>

updated ENE 13, 2009
posted by Natasha
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I assume that a- is being used as a suffix here (not the separate French word), as in amoral.

Zoltán said:

Should the word amagnetic be á magnetic?

>

updated ENE 13, 2009
posted by Natasha
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Should the word amagnetic be á magnetic'

updated ENE 13, 2009
posted by Zoltán
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Thanks for your suggestion. I didn't think of "menos frío" as a way for translating "warm".

updated ENE 13, 2009
posted by Bruce
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Ligero, fuerte, no magnético, muy resistente a corrosión, confortable sobre la muñeca, e hipoalergénico, el titanio es un metal que atrae mucho tanto estéticamente como ténicamente.

I think it needs a comma after "mucho." Also, you have lost the meaning of warmth. Different metals have different thermal properties, and therefore feel more or less cold to the touch. The English is saying that titanium feels warmer than other materials (stainless steel, etc.). I wonder if you could say "es menos frío (a la muñeca / al tacto / al tocarlo / etc.)."

updated ENE 13, 2009
posted by 00bacfba
0
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Would it be acceptable to say : "Ligero, fuerte, no magnético, muy resistente a corrosión, confortable sobre la muñeca, e hipoalergénico, el titanio es un metal que atrae mucho tanto estéticamente como ténicamente.

updated ENE 13, 2009
posted by Bruce
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Sorry, my mistake, there should be a comma between 'strong' and 'amagnetic'...

updated ENE 13, 2009
posted by Bruce
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James Santiago said:

"Light, strong amagnetic, very resistant to corrosion, warm on the wrist, [and] hypoallergenic, titanium is a technically and aesthetically very appealing metal."

Ah, the sweet aroma of context!

In this case either non-magnetic or anti-magnetic would probably be better in English. The English quoted above has a problem, though. "Strong amagnetic" must be an error for either "strong, magnetic" (that is, both strong and amagnetic) or "strongly amagnetic." Assuming the former, the Spanish might be something like this:

Liviano, fuerte, no magnético, muy resistente a corrosión, ...

If it is the latter ("strongly amagnetic"), however, I'm not sure how that would be expressed.

>

updated ENE 13, 2009
posted by Bruce
0
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"Light, strong amagnetic, very resistant to corrosion, warm on the wrist, [and] hypoallergenic, titanium is a technically and aesthetically very appealing metal."

Ah, the sweet aroma of context!

In this case either non-magnetic or anti-magnetic would probably be better in English. The English quoted above has a problem, though. "Strong amagnetic" must be an error for either "strong, magnetic" (that is, both strong and amagnetic) or "strongly amagnetic." Assuming the former, the Spanish might be something like this:

Liviano, fuerte, no magnético, muy resistente a corrosión, ...

If it is the latter ("strongly amagnetic"), however, I'm not sure how that would be expressed.

updated ENE 13, 2009
posted by 00bacfba
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It did not make sense when referring to titanium.

http://www.usfreeads.com/409919-cls.html
https://www.all-spec.com/1/viewitem/3C-TA/ALLSPEC/viewimage/w3path=cat
http://www.pmwf.com/Watches/WATCHSALES/CasioGIEZBlackTiGSHOCKApr03/CasioGIEZBlackTi.htm
etc.

But given that the text in question was probably influenced by French, in which the words antimagnetique and amagnetique are common, it is probably safe to say that a better word could be used in English and Spanish.

updated ENE 13, 2009
posted by 00bacfba