HomeQ&ANew student in my class

New student in my class

0
votes

Hola!

I was hoping you could help me - I have a new student in my nursery school who is from Chile and speaks only Spanish. What I know helped today but I need help with some specific phrases that I use everyday. Would someone be willing to translate the following? Muchas gracias!

Wash your hands / dry your hands
Come for snack
Do you want apple juice / water / cheese / crackers?
Boots off
Come here please
In the line / Line up

5124 views
updated ENE 14, 2009
posted by Dee

24 Answers

1
vote

"la hija del mago" (nada por aquí, nada por allá". smile)

Heidita said:

samdie said:

Once one tries to match up the (English) cracker/biscuit/cookie/cracker with the Spanish galleta/biscote that give eight possible pairings. I wonder if the Aussies would also accept "flat as a cracker/cookie"?

"más lisa que una tabla" jeje

>

updated FEB 3, 2011
posted by 00e657d4
0
votes

It looks like many educators have already helped translate the phrases you posted.
Here's a web page of a free Spanish/English picture dictionary that might be helpful to you in the next
several weeks:

Enchanted Learning- Spanish/English picture dictionary
http://www.enchantedlearning.com/spanish/
Note: Although you now have to pay for full access of the Enchanted Learning site, sections like this are available free of charge.

-Patricia

updated ENE 14, 2009
posted by P-Murphy
0
votes

It depends, but often, yes.

Eddy said:

Surely an adult talking to a child would use the informal tense, or am I wrong.

>

updated ENE 14, 2009
posted by Satlite
0
votes

Surely an adult talking to a child would use the informal tense, or am I wrong.

updated ENE 14, 2009
posted by Eddy
0
votes

Wash your hands

Formal
Lávese las manos, por favor

Informal
Lávate las manos

---|---|--

dry your hands

Formal
Seque sus manos

Informal
Secate las manos
---|---|---|---|---|---|
Come for snack

Formal
Venga a comer

Informal
Ven a comer
---|---|---|---|-

Do you want apple juice?

Formal
Quiere tomar jugo de naranja?

Informal
Quieres tomar jugo de naranja?
---|---|---|---|---|---|

Do you want water?

FOrmal
Quiere tomar agua?

Informal
Quieres tomar agua?

---|---|---|--

do you want cheesee?

Quiere comer queso? (formal)
Quieres comer queso? (informal)
---|---|---|---|---|--

I don't know what crackers means :S

---|---|---|---|--
Boots off

Quitese las botas por favor (formal)
Quitate las botas (informal)
---|---|---|---|--
Come here please

Formal
Venga aquí por favor

Informal
Ven aquí.

updated ENE 14, 2009
posted by luzpariseiffel2
0
votes

About the cookie/cracker issue... I don't know if it's different in Chile, but here in Mexico a cookie is just a cookie (galleta) be it salty, sweet, round, square, long or whatever. You can call it 'galleta' and the person won't especifically expect a sweet cookie.

updated ENE 14, 2009
posted by Satlite
0
votes

samdie said:

Once one tries to match up the (English) cracker/biscuit/cookie/cracker with the Spanish galleta/biscote that give eight possible pairings. I wonder if the Aussies would also accept "flat as a cracker/cookie"?

"más lisa que una tabla" jeje

updated ENE 13, 2009
posted by 00494d19
0
votes

Once one tries to match up the (English) cracker/biscuit/cookie/cracker with the Spanish galleta/biscote that give eight possible pairings. I wonder if the Aussies would also accept "flat as a cracker/cookie"'

updated ENE 12, 2009
posted by samdie
0
votes

Dee said:

James Santiago said:

James you might want to qualify your above answers in relation to agua/queso/crackers in that jugo de is not required for these three. Good point. I guess I assumed that Dee would be able to make that leap on her own, but it never hurts to be explicit.

And you were correct! Thanks for looking out for me though, Eddy!

Didn't want you saying "do you want cheese juice"

updated ENE 12, 2009
posted by Eddy
0
votes

James Santiago said:

James you might want to qualify your above answers in relation to agua/queso/crackers in that jugo de is not required for these three.

Good point. I guess I assumed that Dee would be able to make that leap on her own, but it never hurts to be explicit.

And you were correct! Thanks for looking out for me though, Eddy!

updated ENE 12, 2009
posted by Dee
0
votes

*So in the UK the word biscuit covers both cookies and crackers (as used in the US)?

Interestingly, a popular brand name here in the US is Triscuit, which is a type of cracker. It is made by Nabisco, which is an abbreviation of National Biscuit Company. This company has long been one of the major manufacturers of cookies and crackers. It therefore seems obvious that our words cookie and cracker are relatively young, and that we used to follow the British model.*

We do differentiate between the two. Even though it is a dry biscuit, no one calls it that. Here they are made by Jacobs and are called "cream crackers" mainly because of their off white colour

updated ENE 12, 2009
posted by Eddy
0
votes

Eddy wrote:
A cracker is a normally a square, dry, non sweetened, horrible biscuit which needs butter and jam or cheese on it.

So in the UK the word biscuit covers both cookies and crackers (as used in the US)?

Interestingly, a popular brand name here in the US is Triscuit, which is a type of cracker. It is made by Nabisco, which is an abbreviation of National Biscuit Company. This company has long been one of the major manufacturers of cookies and crackers. It therefore seems obvious that our words cookie and cracker are relatively young, and that we used to follow the British model.

updated ENE 12, 2009
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

James Santiago said:

James you might want to qualify your above answers in relation to agua/queso/crackers in that jugo de is not required for these three.

Good point. I guess I assumed that Dee would be able to make that leap on her own, but it never hurts to be explicit.

When I saw that you had posted to this thread, I was hoping you would have an answer to my question above regarding BrEng usage.


Already have done, see above.

updated ENE 12, 2009
posted by Eddy
0
votes

James you might want to qualify your above answers in relation to agua/queso/crackers in that jugo de is not required for these three.

Good point. I guess I assumed that Dee would be able to make that leap on her own, but it never hurts to be explicit.

updated ENE 12, 2009
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

James Santiago said:

My box of saltine crackers at home says "galletas de soda" on it.

Yeah, I know dictionaries give that word. I was just going from what I have heard people say. I bet the word used varies from region to region. But in this context (a girl now living in Canada), I think using the word crackers might be best.

By the way, a cookie is a biscuit in the UK, but what is a cracker there? And I don't know anything about such usage in Canada, so take my advice accordingly.

A cracker is a normally a square, dry, non sweetened, horrible biscuit which needs butter and jam or cheese on it.

updated ENE 12, 2009
posted by Eddy
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