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atlantes

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"Otros altares, muy distintos, estan decorados al frente con atlantes en alto relieve."

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updated DIC 22, 2008
posted by Paul-Yandre

15 Answers

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You got me. Alto relieve is high relief, not bas relief, that would be bajo relieve. but with regard to free-standing, as opposed to relief carvings, that's what I said, ...more or less.

James Santiago said:

Relief (carving, engraving, casting, etc.) can be either high or low. High relief means the carving, etc., is deep. As to bulto redondo, it is a term used in the art of sculpture, and it refers to a free-standing sculpture (one that can be viewed from any angle around 360 degrees), and is used in contradistinction to relief, which can only be viewed from a limited range of angles.

Other altars, which are quite unusual, are decorated in front with atlantes in high relief. They are thus among the oldest human figures that support altars or roofs, which have been so frequently copied since. The Olmecan atlantes, however, still aren't free-standing, as are those in Chichen Itza or Tula.

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updated DIC 22, 2008
posted by The-Steve
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Relief (carving, engraving, casting, etc.) can be either high or low. High relief means the carving, etc., is deep.

As to bulto redondo, it is a term used in the art of sculpture, and it refers to a free-standing sculpture (one that can be viewed from any angle around 360 degrees), and is used in contradistinction to relief, which can only be viewed from a limited range of angles.

Other altars, which are quite unusual, are decorated in front with atlantes in high relief. They are thus among the oldest human figures that support altars or roofs, which have been so frequently copied since. The Olmecan atlantes, however, still aren't free-standing, as are those in Chichen Itza or Tula.

updated DIC 22, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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Actually I think that these are done in relief (alto rlieve and bas relief are the same thing it seems) instead of being round columns(bulto redondo)

Eddy said:

Paul Yandre said:

Sorry, I'm new to this forum and didn't understand the proper format. I'm studying to take my Mexican citizenship exam and am presently reading: "Historia minima de Mexico", published by the Colegio de Mexico. On page 23, they are talking about the Olmec civilization and following is a sentence that uses the word 'atlantes': "Otros altares, muy distintos, estan decorados al frente con atlantes en alto relieve. Son asi los ejemplos mas antiquos de figuras humanas que soportan altares o techos que tantas veces se repetiran despues. Pero los atlantes olmecas aun no son de bulto redondo como lo seran los de Chicen Itza o de Tula." While we're at it, I don't understand the use of 'bulto' in this sentence.

As Steven has noted, un bulto can be translated as a "lump on the body" or a "swelling, bulge". I assume they are saying that the atlantes olmecas are not as lumpy as those of the chicen Itza, etc, ie they are a lot slimmer.

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updated DIC 22, 2008
posted by The-Steve
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That is an altar. Alter means to change, rearrange, etc.

Nathaniel said:

"Alteres" means alters, as in something that you would make sacrifices or hold religious ceremonies on.

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updated DIC 22, 2008
posted by 0074b507
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Paul Yandre said:

Sorry, I'm new to this forum and didn't understand the proper format. I'm studying to take my Mexican citizenship exam and am presently reading: "Historia minima de Mexico", published by the Colegio de Mexico. On page 23, they are talking about the Olmec civilization and following is a sentence that uses the word 'atlantes': "Otros altares, muy distintos, estan decorados al frente con atlantes en alto relieve. Son asi los ejemplos mas antiquos de figuras humanas que soportan altares o techos que tantas veces se repetiran despues. Pero los atlantes olmecas aun no son de bulto redondo como lo seran los de Chicen Itza o de Tula." While we're at it, I don't understand the use of 'bulto' in this sentence.

As Steven has noted, un bulto can be translated as a "lump on the body" or a "swelling, bulge". I assume they are saying that the atlantes olmecas are not as lumpy as those of the chicen Itza, etc, ie they are a lot slimmer.

updated DIC 22, 2008
posted by Eddy
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Paul Yandre said:

EUREKA! Muchicimas Gracias! It appears that 'a column in the shape of a man' is the definition that fits my context.

Although Nathaniel has explained the meaning, this link gives a better insight regarding decoration using atlantes.
[url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atlas_(architecture)]Atlantes[/url]

updated DIC 22, 2008
posted by Eddy
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Buena suerte en tu camino al ser ciudadano de México.

updated DIC 22, 2008
posted by Nathaniel
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EUREKA! Muchicimas Gracias! It appears that 'a column in the shape of a man' is the definition that fits my context.

updated DIC 22, 2008
posted by Paul-Yandre
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Check this out. It appears that they are a type of statue. In English it would be called an Atlas - A column in the shape of a man. Hopefully these pictures will answer your question: http://www.dallas.net/~lalo/tula.html

updated DIC 22, 2008
posted by Nathaniel
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Oe of the meanings of bulto is shape ,form. bulto redondo would be round shaped I think.

Paul Yandre said:

Sorry, I'm new to this forum and didn't understand the proper format. I'm studying to take my Mexican citizenship exam and am presently reading: "Historia minima de Mexico", published by the Colegio de Mexico. On page 23, they are talking about the Olmec civilization and following is a sentence that uses the word 'atlantes': "Otros altares, muy distintos, estan decorados al frente con atlantes en alto relieve. Son asi los ejemplos mas antiquos de figuras humanas que soportan altares o techos que tantas veces se repetiran despues. Pero los atlantes olmecas aun no son de bulto redondo como lo seran los de Chicen Itza o de Tula." While we're at it, I don't understand the use of 'bulto' in this sentence.

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updated DIC 22, 2008
posted by The-Steve
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Sorry, I'm new to this forum and didn't understand the proper format. I'm studying to take my Mexican citizenship exam and am presently reading: "Historia minima de Mexico", published by the Colegio de Mexico. On page 23, they are talking about the Olmec civilization and following is a sentence that uses the word 'atlantes': "Otros altares, muy distintos, estan decorados al frente con atlantes en alto relieve. Son asi los ejemplos mas antiquos de figuras humanas que soportan altares o techos que tantas veces se repetiran despues. Pero los atlantes olmecas aun no son de bulto redondo como lo seran los de Chicen Itza o de Tula." While we're at it, I don't understand the use of 'bulto' in this sentence.

updated DIC 22, 2008
posted by Paul-Yandre
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estan decorados al frente con atlantes en alto relieve

Tal vez es un error, pero está allí.

updated DIC 22, 2008
posted by The-Steve
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Atlantes isn't in the sentence that he gave us, maybe he mispelled "altares"? "Alteres" means alters, as in something that you would make sacrifices or hold religious ceremonies on.

updated DIC 22, 2008
posted by Nathaniel
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I think the Q is: what is the meaning of atlantes? I haven't been able to find it yet either.

updated DIC 22, 2008
posted by The-Steve
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Is there a question'

updated DIC 22, 2008
posted by Nathaniel
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