HomeQ&AUsage of "mi amor"

Usage of "mi amor"

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I know the phrase, "mi amor" is typically used between husband/wife, boyfriend/girlfriend, and so on. Would it be proper to use it between friends? Between relatives, such as cousins? brother/sister'

30493 views
updated ABR 25, 2010
edited by billy-jones
posted by Mordecai-BenAbraham

12 Answers

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Mordecai BenAbraham said:

Samdie cites an example of "mi amor" used in a casual, friendly way (woman patient to nurse). Now, how about a woman to her close friend and cousin who is male (me)? Let me fill out the picture. Our relationship is close, complex, covers many topics in discussion including personal issues, is not sexual, but is at times flirtatious. Mi amor? or Mi querido? or something else?
My comment was aimed at the more casual relationship. For close friends and relatives I don't find it all that unusual. I wouldn't use it, myself, but that's a matter of personality and upbringing (some people are more effusive/demonstrative than others).

By the way, in that same doctor's office, the receptionist (a somewhat matronly American) uses "love" as a form of address with all the patients.

updated ENE 2, 2009
posted by samdie
0
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Samdie cites an example of "mi amor" used in a casual, friendly way (woman patient to nurse). Now, how about a woman to her close friend and cousin who is male (me)? Let me fill out the picture. Our relationship is close, complex, covers many topics in discussion including personal issues, is not sexual, but is at times flirtatious. Mi amor? or Mi querido? or something else?

samdie said:

lazarus1907 said:

Do you really call your friends and cousins "my love" in English'''''? Don't call me that, please.

I think that there are gender, class and (possibly) regional issues involved. British novels (particularly in dialogs involving the lower/middle class) are full of "luv" and "dearie" as a form of address. American women (again, not upper class) are given to saying "honey", "sweetie", "dearie", etc. (note: these are cases of women speaking to women). Recently, I was (moderately) surprised to hear a woman patient (in a doctor's office) say to one of the nurses "Hola, mi amor: ¿cómo estás? The rest of their conversation made it clear that they were not related nor close friends but simply knew one another from previous visits.

Among men it would, of course, be seriously weird and when used by a man to a woman would be viewed as condescending/sexist.

>

updated ENE 1, 2009
posted by Mordecai-BenAbraham
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But it doesn't apply in our case, Gus. By my age and physical size (6'2", 190 lbs) I am most definitely not her "little cousin". Mi primo querido might be better.

Gus said:

littlle cousin, mi primito querido, my darling little cousin

La Podenquera said:

What does primito means, Gus?

Gus said:

Mi primito querido, or just primito is not mushy at all and it gets the feeling across.

>

updated ENE 1, 2009
posted by Mordecai-BenAbraham
0
votes

lazarus1907 said:

Do you really call your friends and cousins "my love" in English'''''? Don't call me that, please.
I think that there are gender, class and (possibly) regional issues involved. British novels (particularly in dialogs involving the lower/middle class) are full of "luv" and "dearie" as a form of address. American women (again, not upper class) are given to saying "honey", "sweetie", "dearie", etc. (note: these are cases of women speaking to women). Recently, I was (moderately) surprised to hear a woman patient (in a doctor's office) say to one of the nurses "Hola, mi amor: ¿cómo estás? The rest of their conversation made it clear that they were not related nor close friends but simply knew one another from previous visits.

Among men it would, of course, be seriously weird and when used by a man to a woman would be viewed as condescending/sexist.

updated ENE 1, 2009
posted by samdie
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littlle cousin, mi primito querido, my darling little cousin

La Podenquera said:

What does primito means, Gus?

Gus said:

Mi primito querido, or just primito is not mushy at all and it gets the feeling across.

>

updated ENE 1, 2009
posted by 00769608
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Mi primito querido, or just primito is not mushy at all and it gets the feeling across.

updated ENE 1, 2009
posted by 00769608
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I will suggest "mi querido" to her. thanks for your help.

updated ENE 1, 2009
posted by Mordecai-BenAbraham
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Perhaps a better alternative is "mijo". Usually a contraction of "mi hijo", I believe that in the southwest of the USA it's also used as "dear" or "darling". I'm not sure, though, if it's used among adults or only towards children

updated ENE 1, 2009
posted by Mordecai-BenAbraham
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Mordecai BenAbraham said:

No. A woman cousin-once-removed is searching for a spanish term of endearment to call me. We are very close friends.

Well, "mi amor" is "my love". Use it in Spanish the same way you'd use it in English, then.

updated ENE 1, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
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No. A woman cousin-once-removed is searching for a spanish term of endearment to call me. We are very close friends.

updated ENE 1, 2009
posted by Mordecai-BenAbraham
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Do you really call your friends and cousins "my love" in English'''''? Don't call me that, please.

updated ENE 1, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
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So, La Podenquera, would you also not use "mi amor" between cousins? Would you limit it lovers'

updated ENE 1, 2009
posted by Mordecai-BenAbraham
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