HomeQ&AEncantar

Encantar

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I'm curious to know how 'encantar? is used and what meanings it has?

If a man said to me ? eres una persona encantadora.... y a mi me tienes encantado? or 'me encantabas.... desde hace mucho tiempo? (I hope I remembered the words right ... but it was something like that) what does this really mean''? Is encantar commonly used in a friendship or is more in romantically / beloved way'''''?

Also I looked up in the dictionary here the word 'encantar? and there is an example:

? ¡me encanta! -> I love it/him/her!

I know that 'te amo? and 'te quiero? mean I love you, but could I also say ? Me encantas'''''

7662 views
updated ABR 30, 2010
posted by 008fc882

9 Answers

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@ James Santiago
Why don't you really say that''? Isn't it very common to say? Is it old-fashioned''? Is it considered odd?
He also said once directly "Tu me encantas? '. that's why I am asking.

updated ABR 30, 2010
edited by 008fc882
posted by 008fc882
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Okay thank you a lot for the help!!!

James Santiago said:

What sounds old-fashioned in one language might sound very current in another. "You charm me," while being perfectly correct grammatically, just isn't uttered very often. I don't really know why, but that is my experience.

"Me encantas," on the other hand, is probably used much more often, compared to the English phrase.

>

updated ENE 3, 2009
posted by 008fc882
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What sounds old-fashioned in one language might sound very current in another. "You charm me," while being perfectly correct grammatically, just isn't uttered very often. I don't really know why, but that is my experience.

"Me encantas," on the other hand, is probably used much more often, compared to the English phrase.

updated ENE 3, 2009
posted by 00bacfba
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There's an obvious etymological relationship between "encantar" and "enchant" and (like charm) both relate to "weaving/casting spells". Nowadays, if, upon being introduced to someone, you were to say "Enchanted, I'm sure." it would be considered a bit flowery/old-fashioned but not so long ago, it would have been seen as fairly normal. One can still say he (or she) is a charming person and mean interesting/intelligent/witty without any necessary romantic overtones. At the same time, it's usually considered more emphatic than "he's a pleasant fellow", etc As with so many expressions it depends on the context (how and when it's said)..

updated DIC 30, 2008
posted by samdie
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I know that 'te amo? and 'te quiero? mean I love you, but could I also say ? Me encantas''

I forgot to answer this directly.

Yes, you can say it, but it does not mean "I love you." The meaning would be closer to "You are such a delightful person." Literally, it means "You charm me," but of course we don't really say that, and when we do use charm this way, we usually use it in the passive voice, as in "I was charmed by her voice."

On the other hand, "Me encantan las películas de Hitchcock" means "I love Hitchcock's films."

updated DIC 30, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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lazarus1907 said:

"Encantador" is an adjective, not a verb, and it translates as charming.
Or a noun, in which case is (predictably) means "enchanter"/"charmer".

updated DIC 30, 2008
posted by samdie
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Assuming you got the words right (I think 'me encantabas.... desde hace mucho tiempo? should be 'me has encantado desde hace mucho tiempo'), I would say it's definitely leaning toward romantic rather than friendly, but depending on the context and the speaker, it could go either way.

updated DIC 30, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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Basically:

encantar = gustar mucho

"Encantador" is an adjective, not a verb, and it translates as charming.

updated DIC 30, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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I would say this is more friendship but would not surprise me if it could be more than just like. You are a charming person. you can say encantada when you meet someone and that would be like mucho gusto but would almost mean charmed.

buena suerte

updated DIC 30, 2008
posted by Timo
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