ready, set, read

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our library program is called "Ready, Set, Read" and we are to start a biligual program next year and we are having a problem translating "set"

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updated DIC 16, 2008
posted by Publia

11 Answers

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Actually, that "en sus marcas" is only heard in sports on TV, and I wonder whether it is a literal translation. As a child, I've always heard and said:

Preparados, listos, ¡ya!
Preparados, listos, ¡a....'''''!

updated DIC 16, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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James Santiago said:

Mark Baker said:

The English phrase is 'Get set' as in 'On your marks, get set,go!'

I think it depends on the region. I believe that in the UK they also (or only') use "Ready, steady, go!"


Mark's version is the 'official' one. 'Ready, steady, go' would be more likely for an impromptu race, or children's race.

updated DIC 16, 2008
posted by tad
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You are right, we do us 'ready, steady, go!' in the UK. I think the 'set or get set' term is an athletics term, when starting blocks are used.

James Santiago said:

Mark Baker said:

The English phrase is 'Get set' as in 'On your marks, get set,go!'

I think it depends on the region. I believe that in the UK they also (or only') use "Ready, steady, go!"

>

updated DIC 16, 2008
posted by Mark-Baker
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Mark Baker said:

The English phrase is 'Get set' as in 'On your marks, get set,go!'

I think it depends on the region. I believe that in the UK they also (or only') use "Ready, steady, go!"

updated DIC 16, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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The English phrase is 'Get set' as in 'On your marks, get set,go!'

updated DIC 16, 2008
posted by Mark-Baker
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OK, so it's an adverb here, not a conjugated verb, and means something like "Away!" In that case, Sally's suggestion is probably the best.

updated DIC 16, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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LadyDi said:

Maybe 'fuera' is meant as 'a general direction' like 'out' or 'forward'. I'm not sure.

Sorry, ladydi, I had not seen this. yes, you are quite right.

updated DIC 16, 2008
posted by 00494d19
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James, fuera is not used in Spain. In any case it is the word fuera (outside), not he verb.

Sally's answer is the most adequate.

En sus marcas, listos, a leer!

In Spain: a sus puestos, listos , ya

updated DIC 16, 2008
posted by 00494d19
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Maybe 'fuera' is meant as 'a general direction' like 'out' or 'forward'. I'm not sure.

updated DIC 16, 2008
posted by LadyDi
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I think Sally has given a good answer, but I have two questions. I have always seen the whole phrase as:

En sus marcas, listos, ¡fuera! (or ¡ya! at the end).

  1. If that is the basic construction, then wouldn't it be "En sus marcas, listos, ¡leyera!"?

  2. I have always wondered about this construction. Why is the plural used for marcas and listos, but the singular for fuera'

updated DIC 16, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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"Ready, Set, Read" = En sus marcas, listos, a leer!
Another option if that is too long = Preparados, listos, a leer!

updated DIC 16, 2008
posted by Sally