Vale, me lo quedo

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Vale, me lo quedo
can you tell me what this sentence mean'

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updated DIC 6, 2008
posted by faruk

18 Answers

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i think the translation 'I will take it' is correct.

updated DIC 6, 2008
posted by faruk
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first thank you all for your replies
i want to give you some info about the context: a man wants to buy a gift for one of his acquintances, he chooses sth and asks its price. when the salesman says it, the man gives this reply. (Vale, me lo quedo)

updated DIC 6, 2008
posted by faruk
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samdie said:

In English as well (though I confess that I've never heard anyone say it [unless they'd studied Latin]). THe OED lists it with no special qualifications (i.e. it's not marked as obsolete/archaic).

It comes from Latin valeo / valere, which means "be strong / healthy / worth", used as a farewell with the sense of wishing good health. Related to valour, valuable, evaluate, available,...

The OED's latest reference is from 1912; it is not that old-fashioned in Spanish (you still hear it every now and then).

updated DIC 5, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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lazarus1907 said:

In Spain "Vale" is an interjection equivalent to OK, and therefore, it cannot be understood literally as if it was a proper sentence. In the past it used to mean goodbye, but people no longer use it (my father does!)
In English as well (though I confess that I've never heard anyone say it [unless they'd studied Latin]). THe OED lists it with no special qualifications (i.e. it's not marked as obsolete/archaic).

updated DIC 5, 2008
posted by samdie
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Eddy said:

Do you mean people no longer use it as "goodbye" or people no longer use "vale" for OK.

People no longer understand it as a "goodbye", since everyone uses it as an OK. If you write a letter, and you finish it with "Vale", most natives will think that you don't know what "vale" really means (but it is theirs who don't know their heritage).

Daniel said:

I am back for more. Lazarus and Eddy say "Vale" = "OK". Now if the context should be about kids playing a game of tag -- can this sentence mean: ("OK, I'm still it".) How about that -- after all we have no context.

I don't think so, sorry. That "me lo quedo" clearly means "I keep it (for myself)", since it is the only meaning for this transitive construction with "me".

updated DIC 5, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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I am back for more. Lazarus and Eddy say "Vale" = "OK". Now if the context should be about kids playing a game of tag -- can this sentence mean: ("OK, I'm still it".)

How about that -- after all we have no context.

updated DIC 5, 2008
posted by Daniel
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lazarus1907 said:

In Spain "Vale" is an interjection equivalent to OK, and therefore, it cannot be understood literally as if it was a proper sentence. In the past it used to mean goodbye, but people no longer use it (my father does!)

Do you mean people no longer use it as "goodbye" or people no longer use "vale" for OK.

updated DIC 5, 2008
posted by Eddy
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In Spain "Vale" is an interjection equivalent to OK, and therefore, it cannot be understood literally as if it was a proper sentence. In the past it used to mean goodbye, but people no longer use it (my father does!)

updated DIC 5, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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Daniel said:

Let me give this a try: "It's still worth it to me." Any thoughts about my translation?

One further thought. To say "It's still worth it to me" in Spanish, you would say "Todavía (or aún) vale la pena (or merece la pena)." If it is necessary to emphasize the "to me " part, you can add "Creo que..." or "...para mí." You might be tempted to say "Me vale" to express "it is worth it to me," but remember that in some places (especially Mexico), this is a rather crude way of saying "I don't give a damn."

updated DIC 5, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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If this is referring to a man: Ok, I'll buy, I'll take him, he is cute! lol

ok, I'll take him! We often say that here.

updated DIC 5, 2008
posted by 00494d19
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Daniel said:

OK. But this is fun!

Hi Daniel
Vale is used in Spain as an exclamation meaning, sure or OK.

updated DIC 5, 2008
posted by Eddy
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Daniel said:

OK. But this is fun!


Daniel,
The word Vale is also commonly used for an IOU

updated DIC 5, 2008
posted by Sally
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OK. But this is fun!

updated DIC 5, 2008
posted by Daniel
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Nice try, Daniel, but that's completely off track. Vale here has almost nothing to do with "worth."

updated DIC 5, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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Let me give this a try: "It's still worth it to me."

Any thoughts about my translation'

updated DIC 5, 2008
posted by Daniel