"Vísteme despacio que estoy de prisa" I don't get it.

2
votes

My text does not explain what the words mean for this--it just says in English it means, "Haste makes waste." But what do the actual words translate as?

I think I understand the que clause--when I am in a hurry.
I translate the first part to mean "See me slowly" but that doesn't seem to make sense. Does it mean" See how slow I am'"

Gracias.

23501 views
updated AGO 7, 2017
posted by Hal

10 Answers

4
votes

It is actually a quote from Napoleon Bonaparte, he said this to his valet that was to dress him up in his battle uniform: "Dress me slowly, I'm in a hurry", is the best way I can translate to English.

updated AGO 8, 2017
posted by wits29usa
Great answer!
4
votes

"Dress me slowly because I am in a hurry". Make careful preparations (dress carefully = dress slowly) before you set out to do something and you will finish earlier. If you are in ahurry you do not want to go back and start all over again if you (for instance) put on the wrong clothes.

updated AGO 8, 2017
posted by UlfSAndersson
I think this is the more accurate answer.
4
votes

hi hal
another version, slightly different, is "vísteme despacio que tengo prisa". the english equivalent would be "more haste less speed". as solana says, the literal translation does not make any sense in english. just accept it and use it.

updated AGO 8, 2017
posted by Eddy
2
votes

does this mean the more you hurry the bigger your arse gets'

updated AGO 8, 2017
posted by Eddy
2
votes

My grandmother always prefaced this phrase by saying that Napoleon used to say it. That explained why someone else is dressing you.

updated FEB 4, 2011
posted by Friveraz
2
votes

A better English saying would be "Make haste slowly!"

It's the same conclusion we reach when listening (or telling) the story of the Hare and the Tortoise . Even though slow, the Tortoise wins the race by just continuing to move on.

It's the same idea as driving on a freeway and just staying in the same lane, instead of rapidly, frantically, changing lanes to fill in the empty spaces in traffic, only to get to the next stop at the same time as the "slow" car.

By the way, I like the one about the 100 flying birds. It's more picturesque then "two in the bush."

updated FEB 4, 2011
posted by Bernard-Kirzner
2
votes

VISTEME DESPACIO QUE tengo PRISA., MEANS= DRESS ME SLOWLY BECAUSE I'M IN A HURRY, MEJOR HACER LAS COSAS DESPACIO PARA QUE ESTEN BIEN HECHAS........

updated FEB 4, 2011
posted by jose2
1
vote

So 'that' explains it...

Melita, from Canada

updated FEB 4, 2011
posted by Melita
1
vote

So somebody else is dressing me?
Sorry, my brain is fighting this one. I just need to accept that that's the way it is and let it go.

Tanto gracias

Hal

updated FEB 4, 2011
posted by Hal
0
votes

It's similar to English expresions "haste makes waste" or "measure twice, cut once." Something to the effect that it takes less time if you do it slowly and correctly than to do it hastily and have to do it again.

updated AGO 7, 2017
edited by Jennifer6678
posted by Jennifer6678