HomeQ&A"or else" at the end of a sentence

"or else" at the end of a sentence

1
vote

I've looked at the discussions of this at WR, and I know that there is probably no single way to translate this, but I'd like to hear some ideas for translating this in the following examples. The basic idea is that a threat is always implied.

Do your homework, or else!
Leave me alone, or else!
Pay up, or else!

If the "or else" appears in the middle of a sentence (that is, if it is followed by the consequence), I know that we can use "si no...," but what about at the end of the sentence, when the consequence is merely implied'

6656 views
updated JUL 21, 2012
posted by 00bacfba

12 Answers

0
votes

Another ending for "or else" is "te enteras" or "te vas a enterar".

Dejame en paz o te enteras.

Roughly translated it means, "I'm going to give you an ear full" (give you a piece of my mind).

updated DIC 11, 2008
posted by Mark-W
0
votes

lazarus1907 said:

It's maybe just guessing, but we have lots of expressions saying that if you come looking for trouble, you'll get trouble, and similar things:
Does that also account for the "No busques tres pies al gato."? (Never having seen a three-legged cat, much less,

updated DIC 11, 2008
posted by samdie
0
votes

James Santiago said:

Could you explain the construction of "te la buscas" here?

It's maybe just guessing, but we have lots of expressions saying that if you come looking for trouble, you'll get trouble, and similar things:

El que la busca, la encuentra (el que busca la pelea/confrontación, la encuentra)
¡No me busques, que es peor! (¡Don't push me, or else!)
¡Tú te lo has buscado! (You asked for it! - Tú te has buscado el problema/lío)

Bear in mind that "buscar" means, among other things, to provoke someone for a fight. This "lo/la" is never too specific, and it is mostly guessed from context, but "lo" is used mostly for "consequences", and "la" for "trouble". I know It is not a brilliant explanation, but I'm sure you'll get the idea easily.

updated DIC 11, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

Yeah, I guessed that much from the context, but I was hoping to hear an explanation of buscársela, with which I am unfamiliar.

updated DIC 11, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

James Santiago said:

Thanks, those look good, too. But I don't understand one thing.

Que me dejes en paz,¡ que si no te la buscas!

Could you explain the construction of "te la buscas" here?

Just guessing here, but couldn't it translate as "watch out" or Watch it", leave me in peace or else watch out.

updated DIC 11, 2008
posted by Eddy
0
votes

Thanks, those look good, too. But I don't understand one thing.

Que me dejes en paz,¡ que si no te la buscas!

Could you explain the construction of "te la buscas" here'

updated DIC 11, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

Yo siempre digo:

Te he dicho que hagas los deberes...¡¡¡que si no....!!! (enfasis on no)

....o si no...!!!!

Que me dejes en paz,¡ que si no te la buscas!

Que me hagas caso...¡o si no ya verás!

updated DIC 11, 2008
posted by 00494d19
0
votes

What about... "¡o verás!"? (Similar to LadyDi's suggestion)

updated DIC 10, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

Those look good. I especially like how LD was thinking outside the box (although that way lacks the punch of the "or else" at the end, often given with a menacing glare, a pointing finger, or a waved fist).

Thanks to both of you.

updated DIC 10, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

I think you could also say 'más te vale' at the beginning of the sentence...'Más te vale que hagas la tarea.'

updated DIC 10, 2008
posted by LadyDi
0
votes

"o vive con las consquencias"

updated DIC 10, 2008
posted by samdie
0
votes

How about, 'o vas a ver''

updated DIC 10, 2008
posted by LadyDi
SpanishDict is the world's most popular Spanish-English dictionary, translation, and learning website.
© Curiosity Media Inc.