Regular -ER Conjugations

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When using the regular -ER conjugations, in what situation would you use the 2nd person plural ending -eis? Unlike Latin, the 3rd person plural (they) is used also for "all of you" or you plr. Is the 2nd person plural ever used, and when? Are the -ir and -ar conjunctions the same in that way? Gracias!

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updated DIC 6, 2008
posted by Sara-Beth

7 Answers

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I should have mentioned that I was referring to a command, and not a statement. So, if you want to ask someone to eat, and you are using "tú", you have to say "come" to give an order.

My mistake.

updated DIC 6, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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Browser malfunction? It reads incorrectly in my browser. Not worth arguing about. Chalk it up as my misunderstanding.

lazarus1907 said:

If you are talking to one person only using the informal "tú", you say "come"; if you are talking to several people using the informal "vosotros", you say "coméis". In may parts of America they prefer to use "usted" and "ustedes" instead of "tú" and "vosotros", and for those forms they use the same conjugated forms as for "él" and "ellos" (usted come, ustedes comen), but in Spain all forms are used. I can use the second person plural (-éis) several dozens of times a day, but I am Spanish.como - yocomes - túcome - él, ella / ustedcomemos - nosotroscoméis - vosotros, vosotrascomen - ellos, ellas / ustedesThe -ar conjugations are used for verbs ending in -ar, like "amar, -er conjugations are used for verbs ending in -er, like "comer", and the -ir conjugations are used for verbs ending in -ir, like "vivir". That's it.

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updated DIC 6, 2008
posted by 0074b507
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Quentin said:

You wrote tú come (typo)

Sorry, Quentin, but... where did I write "tú come"? I've entered those two words in the search box of my Firefox, and it cannot find it anywhere on this thread, except in your post.

If you are talking to one person only using the informal "tú", you say "come";
If you are talking to a person using only the informal "you", you say "come!".

Mmmm, I guess I should have specified that those forms are actually commands, and not statements.

updated DIC 6, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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You wrote tú come (typo) not tú comes. (In the first sentence of your first reply). I was just saying that that is only true if you are using the familiar command and if you had been using the famiiar command (which you weren't), then the coméis that you later used in that sentence would have to be comed.

This almost sounds like a contrary to fact argument for using the subjunctive. :

updated DIC 6, 2008
posted by 0074b507
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Quentin said:

Unless you meant the imperative, you mistyped: Tú would, of course, be comes. If we were discussing the imperative, vosotros would be comed or no comáis.

I am not sure I'm following, Quentin. The imperative, and their opposite constructions are:

come (tú), no comas (tú)
coma (usted), no coma (usted)
comed (vosotros), no comáis (vosotros)
coman (ustedes), no coman (ustedes)

The present goes like:

(tú) comes, (tú) no comes
(usted) come, (usted) no come
(vosotros) coméis, (vosotros) no coméis
(ustedes) comen, (ustedes) no comen

What did I mistyped or misunderstand'

updated DIC 6, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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Unless you meant the imperative, you mistyped: Tú would, of course, be comes. If we were discussing the imperative, vosotros would be comed or no comáis. Said with all the humility that I can imagine.

lazarus1907 said:

If you are talking to one person only using the informal "tú", you say "come"; if you are talking to several people using the informal "vosotros", you say "coméis". .

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updated DIC 6, 2008
posted by 0074b507
0
votes

If you are talking to one person only using the informal "tú", you say "come"; if you are talking to several people using the informal "vosotros", you say "coméis". In may parts of America they prefer to use "usted" and "ustedes" instead of "tú" and "vosotros", and for those forms they use the same conjugated forms as for "él" and "ellos" (usted come, ustedes comen), but in Spain all forms are used. I can use the second person plural (-éis) several dozens of times a day, but I am Spanish.

como - yo
comes - tú
come - él, ella / usted
comemos - nosotros
coméis - vosotros, vosotras
comen - ellos, ellas / ustedes

The -ar conjugations are used for verbs ending in -ar, like "amar, -er conjugations are used for verbs ending in -er, like "comer", and the -ir conjugations are used for verbs ending in -ir, like "vivir". That's it.

updated DIC 6, 2008
posted by lazarus1907