¿Cómo se dice "next time" en español?

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Hola a todos.

No supe la palabra cuando intentaba escribir la frase - "you would be able to go swimming with me next time" en español. No creo que "la próxima vez" sea la frase correcta.

"Puedas nadar conmigo en la vez próxima. " - Por ejemplo

No creo que "nadar" sea la palabra correcta expresar la significación aquí. Decimos "go swimming" en inglés. No sé si usemos algunas palabras especialas expresar la significación en español.

¿Es "puedas nadar conmigo luego" correcta? - You would be able to go swimming with me later. (')

¿Es "No sé qué dices" correcta? Siempre decimos "I don´t know what you are saying" en inglés. Queiro tener la aclaración de la frase.

Gracias de antemano.

Marco

17648 views
updated DIC 4, 2008
posted by Marco-T

11 Answers

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In English, if you were talking to someone and didn't understand them, you'd have to use the second option. "I don't know what you are saying."

"I don't know what you say" sounds like it needs more to the sentence. For example, "I don't know what you say to him at school, but the way you talk to him on the phone is very rude."

Noralia said:

You can also say just "la próxima" (without "vez"). "Podríamos ir a nadar juntos la próxima"

Also we can use the expression: "en otra oportunidad" meaning some time in the future.

I think that "no sé qué dices" means "I don't know what you say" and "no sé qué estás diciendo" is "I don't know what you are saying"

>

updated DIC 4, 2008
posted by Natasha
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You can also say just "la próxima" (without "vez"). "Podríamos ir a nadar juntos la próxima"

Also we can use the expression: "en otra oportunidad" meaning some time in the future.

I think that "no sé qué dices" means "I don't know what you say" and "no sé qué estás diciendo" is "I don't know what you are saying"

updated DIC 4, 2008
posted by Noralia
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There is a reason why this happens, and some logic behind it, but unfortunately, there is no easy-to-understand-and-use rule for foreign students. If you spend a long time learning deep (impractical) linguistics, you'll find there is a justification for this, but that won't guarantee that you'll be able to speak Spanish, so I don't think it is worth, if speaking fluently (and understanding) is your main goal, so this time my advice is: just memorize it!

In other situations I strongly support understanding and intuition as a main approach, but in this case, you have to pay a high price for a little gain (if you try to understand it), so it is not a very pragmatical approach. Again, it doesn't mean it is a completely random and absurd rule, but just too complex and not very efficient in general, which is why memorizing it pays off this time.

updated DIC 3, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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*Marco:
Your translation suggests that you are overlooking Spanish's use of the verb infinitive as a noun. See the link below. It even uses as an example.

http://spanish.about.com/od/infinitives/a/infinitive_noun.htm

In nadar is translated as swimming; not . The sentence would be better translated as .*

Quentin, you suggestion is very helpful. I read the paragraphes that you gave to me. This is the new knowledge for me.

*The reason why I used the conditional here was because I thought using the conditional is to express more polite.

I think you are confusing the polite use of the conditional in asking questions. "Would you like to go swimming'" "Would you hand me that glass'" The conditional makes it more polite because it adds a hypothetical step, implying "...if I asked you." But in statements, I don't think we usually use the conditional this way.*

James, you gave me really useful imformation and made me clear about this confusion which I had had for long time.

If someone were unable to go swimming with you this time, and you wanted to cheer up the person, you might say, "Don't worry. You can go swimming with me next time." "No te preocupes. Puedes venir/ir a nadar conmigo la próxima vez."

Whether to use ir or venir will depend on whether you are currently at the swimming place.

This is a very good point. {wink}
Most time beginners like myself forget to think about this point, then don´t know which verb we should use.

No tengo una respuesta que sea fácil y útil al mismo tiempo, pero fíjate en esto:

Voy en junio = Voy el próximo junio

El adjetivo "próximo" no modifica el significado de la frase, al igual que hacen otros adjetivos que aparecen antes del nombre (explicativos), ya que se sobreentiende que va a ser el próximo. "Voy el junio próximo" es correcto también, pero mucho menos frecuente.

Sin embargo, en "la semana pasada" no podemos hacer la misma suposición, ya que podría haber sido cualquier semana. Esta restricción es típica de los adjetivos que aparecen detrás del nombre (calificativos).

Esto no es una regla, pero el análisis que dan las gramáticas descriptivas usa esta idea como fundamento.

En este caso, te recomiendo que te lo memorices sin más.

At this time, I did not get you very clear, lazarus. I guess it is because this is not the rule, but needs to be memorized.
"La próxima semana" y "la semana pasada" are just different for these two forms. That is all, no reason. Just need to remember them. Am I right?

Muchas gracias, Quentin, James y Lazarus. Sois muy, muy útil como siempre.

Marco

updated DIC 3, 2008
posted by Marco-T
0
votes

Marco T said:

Por favor puedes darme la razón por qué usamos "la próxima vez" y "la semana pasada".

No tengo una respuesta que sea fácil y útil al mismo tiempo, pero fíjate en esto:

Voy en junio = Voy el próximo junio

El adjetivo "próximo" no modifica el significado de la frase, al igual que hacen otros adjetivos que aparecen antes del nombre (explicativos), ya que se sobreentiende que va a ser el próximo. "Voy el junio próximo" es correcto también, pero mucho menos frecuente.

Sin embargo, en "la semana pasada" no podemos hacer la misma suposición, ya que podría haber sido cualquier semana. Esta restricción es típica de los adjetivos que aparecen detrás del nombre (calificativos).

Esto no es una regla, pero el análisis que dan las gramáticas descriptivas usa esta idea como fundamento.

En este caso, te recomiendo que te lo memorices sin más.

updated DIC 3, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

The reason why I used the conditional here was because I thought using the conditional is to express more polite.

I think you are confusing the polite use of the conditional in asking questions. "Would you like to go swimming'" "Would you hand me that glass'" The conditional makes it more polite because it adds a hypothetical step, implying "...if I asked you." But in statements, I don't think we usually use the conditional this way.

If someone were unable to go swimming with you this time, and you wanted to cheer up the person, you might say, "Don't worry. You can go swimming with me next time." "No te preocupes. Puedes venir/ir a nadar conmigo la próxima vez."

Whether to use ir or venir will depend on whether you are currently at the swimming place.

updated DIC 3, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

Marco:
Your translation suggests that you are overlooking Spanish's use of the verb infinitive as a noun. See the link below. It even uses as an example.

http://spanish.about.com/od/infinitives/a/infinitive_noun.htm

In nadar is translated as swimming; not . The sentence would be better translated as .

Marco T said:

¿Quieres venir a nadar luego'" is better to express this meaning, but it is more complicated - "do you want to come to swim later'" More complicated sentences does not mean they are not good, sí'Marco

updated DIC 3, 2008
posted by 0074b507
0
votes

James Santiago said:

It is "la próxima vez."You would be able to go swimming with me next timePodrías nadar (o, ir a nadar) conmigo la próxima vez.The English sounds odd to me, though, and it's hard to imagine a scenario in which it would be applicable."You would be able to go swimming with me next time if you knew how to swim, but since you don't, you won't be able to go with me."Why are you using the conditional here?

James.

I know that "you would be able to go swimming with me later" sounds odd. Actually I wanted to write "we would be able to go swimming together later, but I did not know how to write "together" in Spanish.
The reason why I used the conditional here was because I thought using the conditional is to express more polite. I am not sure if I am right.

Marco

updated DIC 3, 2008
posted by Marco-T
0
votes

lazarus1907 said:

"La próxima vez" es la frase correcta.Tienes que decir "¿Puedes nadar conmigo luego'", en indicativo, pero suena mejor "¿Quieres venir a nadar luego'""No sé qué dices" es perfecto.

Gracias, mi maestro por tu respuesta.
Por favor puedes darme la razón por qué usamos "la próxima vez" y "la semana pasada".
Do we not use "la vez próxima" if "la semena pasada" is correct? I got confused here.

"¿Quieres venir a nadar luego'" is better to express this meaning, but it is more complicated - "do you want to come to swim later'" More complicated sentences does not mean they are not good, sí?

Marco

updated DIC 3, 2008
posted by Marco-T
0
votes

It is "la próxima vez."

You would be able to go swimming with me next time
Podrías nadar (o, ir a nadar) conmigo la próxima vez.

The English sounds odd to me, though, and it's hard to imagine a scenario in which it would be applicable.

"You would be able to go swimming with me next time if you knew how to swim, but since you don't, you won't be able to go with me."

Why are you using the conditional here'

updated DIC 3, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

"La próxima vez" es la frase correcta.

Tienes que decir "¿Puedes nadar conmigo luego'", en indicativo, pero suena mejor "¿Quieres venir a nadar luego'"

"No sé qué dices" es perfecto.

Y "No sé si usamos..." también va en indicativo (debido al "si", que es distinto al "que").

updated DIC 3, 2008
posted by lazarus1907