Can you mow the yard one more time please?

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I need an accurate translation from english to spanish please

3539 views
updated OCT 2, 2010
posted by Randy-Makin

7 Answers

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voy a cortar tu sacate

zacate.

(Del nahua zacatl).

  1. m. Am. Cen., Filip. y Méx. Hierba, pasto, forraje.

  2. m. Méx. Estropajo para fregar.

updated OCT 2, 2010
posted by 0074b507
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My neighbors are Oregon farmworkers from Mexico, and in their more simple Spanish, Rosa says to me that many of her people don't know the word cesped. Instead they use the word "sacate". She is from a small village. When her husband Eliazar mows my lawn, he says "voy a cortar tu sacate". They don't speak any English.

updated OCT 2, 2010
posted by apalazzoangulo
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Thank you: I was in the context where -- I was out of town and wanted the lawn mowed four days from now. So the future tense would be correct. But if I was asking in the very near future the conditional tense is used.

James Santiago said:

I'm not the ultimate source, but I believe that Spanish and English conditional meanings are the same in this case. When we ask politely we often use the conditional to soften the impact of the request. That is, we are implying "If I asked you, could you...'" On the other hand, "Will you..." in English is a slightly less formal, but still polite, way of asking, but we don't use the future that way in Spanish, at least as far as I know. And "Will you be able to..." sounds to me as if you are actually asking about a future time. "Will you be able to mow the lawn next Monday'" In that case, yes, the future could be used in Spanish, but if you are referring to the present, which is what seems to be the case here, then we wouldn't use the future tense in Spanish.

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updated DIC 9, 2008
posted by Daniel
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I'm not the ultimate source, but I believe that Spanish and English conditional meanings are the same in this case. When we ask politely we often use the conditional to soften the impact of the request. That is, we are implying "If I asked you, could you...'" On the other hand, "Will you..." in English is a slightly less formal, but still polite, way of asking, but we don't use the future that way in Spanish, at least as far as I know. And "Will you be able to..." sounds to me as if you are actually asking about a future time. "Will you be able to mow the lawn next Monday'" In that case, yes, the future could be used in Spanish, but if you are referring to the present, which is what seems to be the case here, then we wouldn't use the future tense in Spanish.

updated DIC 9, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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Hi James: I translated the statement in my head, and was identical with yours except I used "podrás" -- future tense. Can you help with your use of the conditional tense here?

James Santiago said:

Por favor, ¿podrías cortar el césped una vez más (o, otra vez)'You might want to add your reason for this request, as that will make everything more clear.

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updated DIC 9, 2008
posted by Daniel
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Thank you Mr. Santiago.

updated DIC 9, 2008
posted by Randy-Makin
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Por favor, ¿podrías cortar el césped una vez más (o, otra vez)?

You might want to add your reason for this request, as that will make everything more clear.

updated DIC 9, 2008
posted by 00bacfba