Noun with many adjectives: How to translate....

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Musqueam Community Kitchen Garden.

Help with this would be much appreciated!

1623 views
updated DIC 8, 2008
posted by emma

15 Answers

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I would not presume to argue with the RAE, but I know I've read this in a book about Mexico referring merely to a cottage vegetable garden.

lazarus1907 said:

huerta. (De huerto).

  1. f. Terreno de mayor extensión que el huerto, destinado al cultivo de legumbres y árboles frutales.

  2. f. Tierra de regadío.

Real Academia Española © Todos los derechos reservados

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updated DIC 8, 2008
posted by Natasha
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That's a very good point, Quentin, and you may be right. If so, then the Spanish might be "Huerta de la Cocina Comunitaria Musqueam."

Stringing nouns together is very convenient in English, but it can also be confusing.

updated DIC 8, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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Musqueam Community Kitchen Garden: The garden plot, managed by students and nutritionists from the Musqueam First Nation, addresses nutrition concerns by supplying produce to the Musqueam community kitchen. Crops are planted to meet specific identified nutritional needs, such as diets that are compatible with diabetes, and are integrated into a cycle of community dinners.

I'm not so sure. It says that the harvest from this huerta goes to a community kitchen. I think the title was referring to the kitchen, not the garden. I think this kitchen takes the produce from the huerta and prepares special meals for medical needs. At least, that's how I read it.

updated DIC 8, 2008
posted by 0074b507
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huerta.
(De huerto).
1. f. Terreno de mayor extensión que el huerto, destinado al cultivo de legumbres y árboles frutales.
2. f. Tierra de regadío.

Real Academia Española © Todos los derechos reservados

updated DIC 8, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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Quentin, I see that you are quite correct in regards to Emma's description, but that doesn't quite fit the English phrase (in my opinion).

Here I found this:

Musqueam Community Kitchen Garden: The garden plot, managed by students and nutritionists from the Musqueam First Nation, addresses nutrition concerns by supplying produce to the Musqueam community kitchen. Crops are planted to meet specific identified nutritional needs, such as diets that are compatible with diabetes, and are integrated into a cycle of community dinners.

If that's correct, we're back to huerta for community kitchen garden. She would need different phrases to talk about the community dinners or the community kitchen.

updated DIC 8, 2008
posted by Natasha
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According to our dictionary is the correct word.

Kitchen Garden

According to emma's post, however, I think Gus was correct and this is referring to a particular type of kitchen and not a particular type of garden. She knows the context better than we do.

So we're back to: La cocina del jardín de la comunidad de Musqueam.

Natasha said:

Quentin suggested huerto. The word I knew was huerta (feminine), from Mexico, for vegetable garden (as opposed to flower garden). So now, is huerta universally understood? Or would it be better to use huerto'I've seen a garden like this in Queens, NY, where undeveloped real estate is in short supply. People from the community could have a small plot (a few feet square) to grow vegetables. My attempt:Huerta de la Comunidad de Musqueam.("Kitchen garden" sounds like a throwback to the days when large estates had multiple gardens, including one for kitchen use. However, since "Community" is included, that was presumably not the intended meaning.)

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updated DIC 8, 2008
posted by 0074b507
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Quentin suggested huerto. The word I knew was huerta (feminine), from Mexico, for vegetable garden (as opposed to flower garden). So now, is huerta universally understood? Or would it be better to use huerto?

I've seen a garden like this in Queens, NY, where undeveloped real estate is in short supply. People from the community could have a small plot (a few feet square) to grow vegetables. My attempt:

Huerta de la Comunidad de Musqueam.

("Kitchen garden" sounds like a throwback to the days when large estates had multiple gardens, including one for kitchen use. However, since "Community" is included, that was presumably not the intended meaning.)

updated DIC 8, 2008
posted by Natasha
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i'm actually not so sure myself- i think it is where community dinners are cooked. it doesn't really matter where the ingredients come from, but they are all cooked in a common place for the community dinner.

updated DIC 7, 2008
posted by emma
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No, I think is is a garden where only things for the kitchen (vegetables, not flowers) are grown. My guess, anyway. Everyone in the community helps maintain the garden (weed, mulch, compost, etc. and all share the harvest).

Gus said:

Are you saying a kitchen where only vegetables are cook?

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updated DIC 7, 2008
posted by 0074b507
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Are you saying a kitchen where only vegetables are cook'

updated DIC 7, 2008
posted by 00769608
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Jardín y cocina de la comunidad de Musqueam.

Hortaliza y cocina de la comunidad de Musqueam.

updated DIC 7, 2008
posted by 00769608
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el huerto
(why didn't you just say a communal vegetable garden? :>)

updated DIC 7, 2008
posted by 0074b507
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I don't know what a Kitchen Garden nor a Garden Kitchen is so I'll leave that, but the rest should be:
googling- I guess it is a Kitchen Garden

El jardín de la cocina de la comunidad de Musqueam. (assuming that Musqueam is the name of the community.)

emma said:

Jardín communidad de la Cocina de Musqueam...''Thanks, by the way!

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updated DIC 7, 2008
posted by 0074b507
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Jardín communidad de la Cocina de Musqueam...'?

Thanks, by the way!

updated DIC 7, 2008
posted by emma
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Those are all nouns; there are no adjectives in your phrase.

Spanish nouns are normally joined by "de". One of the few exceptions where "de" is no needed is when one one noun is the proper name of the other one, like in "Río Támesis" (river Thames). Wanna try now'

updated DIC 7, 2008
posted by lazarus1907