The Significance of "Le"

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Se rascó la espesa pelambrera que LE asomaba bajo el sucio turbante.

I was wondering what the significance of "le" is in this sentence.

4647 views
updated NOV 21, 2008
posted by Eddy

17 Answers

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But the third-person preterit of caer is cayó.

That was just a mistake, I don't have an excuse for it. Maybe we should close the thread before it accumulates any more mistakes!!

updated NOV 21, 2008
posted by Natasha
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samdie said:

James Santiago said:

If that's what I said, then it was a mistake. I meant to say "Another monkey has fallen." Does "Se le ha caído a otro mono" mean that, or does it mean "Another monkey has dropped something"?

I would think that you want "Se ha caido otro mono."

You might be right. I was thinking that I wanted to use that deflected responsibility form, but maybe that doesn't work when it is the subject doing the action. I was probably trying to be too fancy.

Natasha wrote:
El mono se caó. / The monkey fell.
Se le caó una banana al mono. / The monkey dropped a banana.

Again, I was trying to deflect responsibility, but probably screwed up. But the third-person preterit of caer is cayó.

updated NOV 21, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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James Santiago said:

If that's what I said, then it was a mistake. I meant to say "Another monkey has fallen." Does "Se le ha caído a otro mono" mean that, or does it mean "Another monkey has dropped something"?
I would think that you want "Se ha caido otro mono."

updated NOV 21, 2008
posted by samdie
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Those kinds of constructions always confuse me.

El mono se caó. / The monkey fell.
Se le caó una banana al mono. / The monkey dropped a banana.

or am I messing things up again?

James Santiago said:

But here James seems to be saying that this monkey dropped something, whereas in the other post the monkey (me) was falling out of the tree.

If that's what I said, then it was a mistake. I meant to say "Another monkey has fallen." Does "Se le ha caído a otro mono" mean that, or does it mean "Another monkey has dropped something"?

>

updated NOV 20, 2008
posted by Natasha
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But here James seems to be saying that this monkey dropped something, whereas in the other post the monkey (me) was falling out of the tree.

If that's what I said, then it was a mistake. I meant to say "Another monkey has fallen." Does "Se le ha caído a otro mono" mean that, or does it mean "Another monkey has dropped something"'

updated NOV 20, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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But here James seems to be saying that this monkey dropped something, whereas in the other post the monkey (me) was falling out of the tree.

samdie said:

Heidita said:

Lazarus...¿tú entiendes lo del mono de James?

Whether Lazarus understands/remembers or not, I think James is referring to his mention (last week) of a Japanese refrán that (in English) would be "Even monkeys fall out of trees." (i.e. even the most expert occasionally make mistakes [or, if you prefer something classical, "even Homer sometimes nods"]).

P.S. You can find the thread by searching for "saru".

P.P.S. Heidita: You replied to James' (above cited) reply!

>

updated NOV 20, 2008
posted by Natasha
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Heidita said:

Lazarus...¿tú entiendes lo del mono de James?
Whether Lazarus understands/remembers or not, I think James is referring to his mention (last week) of a Japanese refrán that (in English) would be "Even monkeys fall out of trees." (i.e. even the most expert occasionally make mistakes [or, if you prefer something classical, "even Homer sometimes nods"]).

P.S. You can find the thread by searching for "saru".
P.P.S. Heidita: You replied to James' (above cited) reply!

updated NOV 20, 2008
posted by samdie
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Lazarus...¿tú entiendes lo del mono de James'

updated NOV 20, 2008
posted by 00494d19
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Oh, no! Why did I write it with H'

updated NOV 20, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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James Santiago said:

Ah, debe de ser ortigas, por cierto. Se le ha caído a otro mono...

¿Mande'

updated NOV 20, 2008
posted by 00494d19
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Ah, debe de ser ortigas, por cierto. Se le ha caído a otro mono...

updated NOV 20, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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Natasha said:

Me preguntaba lo mismo. El diccionario tiene ortiga (que es maleza, claro) pero no tiene hortiga. Con otro miembro, diría que es falta de ortografía, pero con Lázaro, no sabemos.

James Santiago said:

Pero, ¿qué son hortigas? ¿Malezas?

ortiga: nettle

maleza: undergrowth, weeds

updated NOV 20, 2008
posted by 00494d19
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Me preguntaba lo mismo. El diccionario tiene ortiga (que es maleza, claro) pero no tiene hortiga. Con otro miembro, diría que es falta de ortografía, pero con Lázaro, no sabemos.

James Santiago said:

Pero, ¿qué son hortigas? ¿Malezas?

>

updated NOV 20, 2008
posted by Natasha
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Pero, ¿qué son hortigas? ¿Malezas'

updated NOV 20, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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I think James explained it pretty well. These indirect objects (and datives) seem to be used to try, at all cost, to prevent the use of possessives, indicating that something is part of someone or something, belongs to this person or thing, or affects this person or thing:

Se le cayó una taza.
Le han salido canas.
Al jardín le han salido hortigas por todos lados.
Al niño le ha salido ya un diente.
El pelo le llega hasta la cintura.
Al coche se le ha caído el tubo de escape.

updated NOV 20, 2008
posted by lazarus1907