Nothing to sneeze at

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I would like to know how this is said in spanish.

" Yeah 30,000 dollars is nothing to sneeze at". Meaning something that is not taken lightly or no small thing. Thanks wink

2824 views
updated NOV 19, 2008
posted by Cherub1

7 Answers

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See Dictionary.com (below)

snood? '/snud/ Show Spelled Pronunciation [snood] Show IPA Pronunciation

'noun 1. the distinctive headband formerly worn by young unmarried women in Scotland and northern England.
2. a headband for the hair.
3. a netlike hat or part of a hat or fabric that holds or covers the back of a woman's hair.
4. the pendulous skin over the beak of a turkey.
'verb (used with object) 5. to bind or confine (the hair) with a snood.
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Origin:
bef. 900; ME: fillet, ribbon; OE sn'd4

there are many more references, this is just the easiest one.

And it doesn't surprise me that snood and moco took a similar path. I say similar because snood and snot have some movement while moco has remanined a single word with a change in the imagery of it's meaning. it's common sense that Anglos as well as Spanish would have associated the turkey's snood with boogers.

updated NOV 19, 2008
posted by Nickp
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Interesting, Nick! It's also interesting that this meaning of snood is not in any of the dictionaries I checked, which give only this:

1a Scottish : a fillet or band for a woman's hair b: a net or fabric bag pinned or tied on at the back of a woman's head for holding the hair

However, I do see that it has a lot of Web presence in the turkey meaning.

Even more intriguing is the similarity in spelling between snood and snot, making me wonder if they share a common ancestor. Both come from Anglo Saxon, but the former is snod and the latter snot (all the crudest English words come from AS!). It would be a fascinating coincidence if snood/snot share something with moco in its two meanings.

updated NOV 19, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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Actually, "moco" as a spanish word for snot comes from it's original meaning: "snood" which is the bulbous skin that hangs from the top of the turkey's beak. Now colorfully adapted to mean what hangs from the bottom of our beaks. I too have heard the explanation about pickpockets refrenced above. but would still be inclined to believe it is a reference to something insignificant or useless through the actual turkey snood that has no apparent use (for the turkey or it's henchmen). Regardless, a more formal and universal term would be the "no es poca cosa" as previously suggested.

updated NOV 19, 2008
posted by Nickp
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Muy interesante. Sí mi proxima pregunta estaba sobre tu primera surgerencia, si " no es poca cosa significado lo mismo. Gracías.

updated NOV 19, 2008
posted by Cherub1
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Cheurb, I was familiar with the "no es moco de pavo" that Lazarus gave you, but I suggested "no es poca cosa" (in your duplicate thread that has since been deleted) because I thought it might be understood more universally in the Hispanic world (I'm not sure). But both mean the same thing.

You might think that this phrase means "it's not turkey snot," but I found this interesting explanation to the contrary.

En esta jerga, los rufianes y ladrones llamaban "moco" al trozo de cadena que quedaba después de robar el reloj de bolsillo de la víctima, que era conocido como "pavo". Así, cuando éste iba a sacar su reloj para ver la hora, se encontraba entre sus dedos aquella especie de moquillo, bailando fláccido en el interior del bolsillo, desprovisto de toda utilidad.

updated NOV 19, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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Thank you.

updated NOV 19, 2008
posted by Cherub1
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30.000 dólares no es moco de pavo.

updated NOV 19, 2008
posted by lazarus1907