HomeQ&Aindiginous person

indiginous person

0
votes

What is the general Spanish noun (term or phrase) for "indiginous person'" When is "nativo, va" appropriate. When is "indigino, na" appropriate? Is there another'

2544 views
updated NOV 16, 2008
posted by Dale-Pearson

12 Answers

0
votes

I live in a rural Mexican village. The word used here is el/la indigina. It is a noun. It is used to refer to any person native to the area; not of European descent nor a mestizo, of mixed descent. It doesn't imply being primitive.

updated NOV 16, 2008
posted by Redimida
0
votes

maggie said:

you can say aborigen, but only as an adjective. las plantas aborígenes de Colombia.

This is not exact, maggie.

aborigen.

(Sing. formado a partir del pl. lat. aborig'nes).

  1. adj. Originario del suelo en que vive. Tribu, animal, planta aborigen.

  2. adj. Se dice del primitivo morador de un país, por contraposición a los establecidos posteriormente en él. U. m. c. s. pl. "usado más como sustantivo plural"

updated NOV 15, 2008
posted by 00494d19
0
votes

you can say aborigen, but only as an adjective.
las plantas aborígenes de Colombia.

updated NOV 15, 2008
posted by maggie
0
votes

Again, sorry folks, I really didn't mean to confuse everybody.

James Santiago said:

I didn't mean to imply that it is ONLY used as a noun here, but that it is ALSO used as a noun. I was just refuting Natasha's statement to the contrary. And my statement that "this applies to Spanish everywhere" meant that the word can be used as a noun everywhere, in addition to being used as an adjective.

>

updated NOV 14, 2008
posted by Natasha
0
votes

I didn't mean to imply that it is ONLY used as a noun here, but that it is ALSO used as a noun. I was just refuting Natasha's statement to the contrary. And my statement that "this applies to Spanish everywhere" meant that the word can be used as a noun everywhere, in addition to being used as an adjective.

updated NOV 14, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

James Santiago said:

No, I'm not referring to that usage. The noun is el indígena or la indígena. It's just an ordinary noun. And as far as I know, this applies to Spanish everywhere.

In Spain it can be both:

Plantas indígenas (adjective)
Los indígenas (noun)

However, if I had to choose (luckily I don't have to), I'd go for adjective rather than noun in Spanish.

updated NOV 14, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

No, I'm not referring to that usage. The noun is el indígena or la indígena. It's just an ordinary noun. And as far as I know, this applies to Spanish everywhere.

updated NOV 14, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

Natasha said:

Use the dictionary, it's aborigen. However, I'm not sure if the usage in Spanish extends beyond the meaning of "a native of Australia."

Dale Pearson said:

Thank you. Does this mean that there is no Spanish noun like "aborigine'"

I have always like the sound of the word "autóctono", indigenous, native.

updated NOV 14, 2008
posted by Eddy
0
votes

Use the dictionary, it's aborigen. However, I'm not sure if the usage in Spanish extends beyond the meaning of "a native of Australia."

Dale Pearson said:

Thank you. Does this mean that there is no Spanish noun like "aborigine'"

>

updated NOV 14, 2008
posted by Natasha
0
votes

Thank you. Does this mean that there is no Spanish noun like "aborigine'"

updated NOV 14, 2008
posted by Dale-Pearson
0
votes

Usually when referring to indigenous people you would refer to natives living in primitive conditions. Natives are those who are from a specific area, but they could be completely integrated into the modern culture. I would apply the same meaning and usage to these words in Spanish as I do in English.

updated NOV 14, 2008
posted by Nathaniel
0
votes

The correct spelling in English is indigenous. The correct spelling in Spanish is indígena and indígena is an adjective, not a noun.

nativo/a is also an adjective.

updated NOV 14, 2008
posted by Natasha
SpanishDict is the world's most popular Spanish-English dictionary, translation, and learning website.
© Curiosity Media Inc.
SOCIAL NETWORKS
APPS