HomeQ&Aas long as...

as long as...

0
votes

Buenas tardes amigos:

Quiero decir -

"I like working outdoors, as long as it doesn't rain!"

  • Me gusta trabajar fuera...

...siempre y cuando no llueve.
...mientras no llueve.
...con tal de que no llueva.
...siempre que no llueva.

¿Qué te parece?

Muchas gracias. Patch.

3764 views
updated NOV 14, 2008
posted by patch

9 Answers

0
votes

En Argentina decimos "afuera" para referirnos a "outdoors"
Como nativa diría esas frases de la siguiente manera:
siempre y cuando no llueva (subjuntivo)
mientras no llueva (as long as...)
mientras no llueve (en este caso mientras no está indicando en qué condiciones te gusta trabajar afuera, sino en qué momento. Podrías decir: "Me gusta trabajar afuera mientras no llueve y cuando empieza a llover me voy para adentro).
con tal de que no llueva y siempre que no llueva son correctas también
Te agrego una expresión más: "en tanto y en cuanto" no llueva
¿la conocían'

updated NOV 14, 2008
posted by Noralia
0
votes

¡Gracias a todos por las respuestas!

updated NOV 12, 2008
posted by patch
0
votes

Sally said:

I will take your word for it, Lazarus. I agree with the comment that many natives don't make the distinction.

It is a fact that not making the distinction is normal, even in formal written Spanish, but those adverbs were originally created by fusing the preposition "a", indicating motion, and the static adverb. It is ironical that natives in the past created those adverbs with "a" to be able to express a rather subtle distinction accurately, and modern natives have decided to avoid the original adverb, and use in all situations the one that was modified to express motion, losing the distinction in the process. Do people just prefer words that start with "a", or what'

updated NOV 12, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

I will take your word for it, Lazarus.
I agree with the comment that many natives don't make the distinction.

updated NOV 12, 2008
posted by Sally
0
votes

'Banana' said:

me gustaria trabajar a fuera siempre y cuando no llueva.

That "a" is used for motion, like "to" or "towards" in English.

updated NOV 12, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

me gustaria trabajar a fuera siempre y cuando no llueva.

Banana

updated NOV 12, 2008
posted by tbananat
0
votes

Me gusta trabajar fuera cuando no llueve. (this implies that I have done it before)
Me gusta trabajar fuera siempre que no llueva.
Me gusta trabajar fuera siempre y cuando no llueva.

Sally said:

Back to that afuera vs. fuera question. I think in this case it would be: Me gusta trabajar afuera mientras no llueva.

Many natives don't make this distinction, but the "a" in "afuera" implies motion (as in "ir a..."):

¿Dónde estás? Estoy fuera.
¿Adónde vas? Voy afuera.

¿Dónde está? Está delante.
¿Adónde fue? Fue adelante.

Given the choice, much better "fuera" in this case, since "trabajar" is not a verb of motion.

updated NOV 12, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

Back to that afuera vs. fuera question.
I think in this case it would be: Me gusta trabajar afuera mientras no llueva.

updated NOV 12, 2008
posted by Sally
0
votes

The dictionary suggest the following, in agreement with what you've posted above.

as long as -> mientras, siempre que (providing)

as long as he is alive,? -> mientras viva,?

As long as I live -> mientras viva

Based on that, I think you could say:

Me gusta trabajar fuera mientras no llueva.

But wait for native Spanish speakers . . .

updated NOV 12, 2008
posted by Natasha
SpanishDict is the world's most popular Spanish-English dictionary, translation, and learning website.
© Curiosity Media Inc.