Ni fu ni fa

3
votes

Ni fu ni fa

i believe it means like (mas o menos) but someone told me that it means (nothing)
like saying: no intendi ni fu ni fa.
what is the meaning for it ?
ans what does FU and FA mean'

20112 views
updated ENE 20, 2014
posted by PUNISHER

17 Answers

2
votes

Well I got it Samdie! Heidi, James called a cat's hiss "coarse and crude". And we all know how you love your cats..... smile

samdie said:

Trying to raise Heidita's dander, are we?

Heidita said:

I guess he meant the cats, James...unless it went right over my head, too.

>

updated ENE 20, 2014
posted by Valerie
1
vote

Ni fu ni fa is catalan for 'i don't care' my partner speaks Spanish and Catalan (he's a native) heard him saying it a few times- hope this helped smile

updated ENE 20, 2014
posted by Tasha92
1
vote

Misspelling, should be indifferent (in case anyone tries to look it up)

picoroco said:

Ni fu ni fa = Idenfferent = It is all the same to me.

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updated ENE 20, 2014
posted by Natasha
1
vote

Ni fu ni fa = Idenfferent = It is all the same to me.

updated ENE 20, 2014
posted by picoroco
1
vote

James Santiago said:

samdie said:

James Santiago said:

...the coiner was referring to fu, a cat's hiss in Spanish, and fa, the fourth note on the musical scale. Both are sounds, with one being coarse and crude and the other elegant and refined. That fits with the meaning, which is:

Trying to raise Heidita's dander, are we?

That one went right over my head, samdie.

I will remember both : raise my dander...wonderful, and going over the head...seen that before used by James..jeje

I guess he meant the cats, James...unless it went right over my head, too.

Esto no lo he pillado/esto se me ha escapado

updated ENE 20, 2014
posted by 00494d19
1
vote

James Santiago said:

Marco said:

No sé la significación de "ni fu ni fa" en español, pero creo que es familiar a chino. Tenemos "ni", "fu" y "fa" en chino.

I would be astonished if this phrase had anything to do with Chinese. I would guess that it was coined mainly because it sounds good, but it is possible that the coiner was referring to fu, a cat's hiss in Spanish, and fa, the fourth note on the musical scale. Both are sounds, with one being coarse and crude and the other elegant and refined. That fits with the meaning, which is:1. loc. col. Se usa para indicar que algo resulta indiferente:-¿qué tal la película? -ni fu ni fa.Of course, the above conjecture is just that and nothing more, but I would have to see evidence of the Chinese connection to believe it.I think this expression is often similar to así así.

Hi James,

As many people know that Chinese people use completely different way to write words. You are an export for Japanese, so you should know that. Also Chinese people use "PinYin" to connect Chinese words to 26 English letters.
For example, "ni" with third tone can be meant as "you" - singular. If "fu" and "fa" are with the certain tones, you can easily find some Chinese words pronounced the same.
It can be easily explained to pronunciation using English letters with tones and different ways in writing.
So when I saw the question, the first thing came across my mind was that question: Was Punisher asking for some Chinese words? Then after I read the reply from Natasha, I was surprised because she was saying that Heidita used that expression before. I was wondering how Heidita could use that. The answer that I could have was if Heidita knows Chinese. But I was still wondering after I got that answer from myself.

I don't know if my explanation would make sense for you, James.

Marco

updated ENE 20, 2014
posted by Marco-T
1
vote

samdie said:

James Santiago said:

...the coiner was referring to fu, a cat's hiss in Spanish, and fa, the fourth note on the musical scale. Both are sounds, with one being coarse and crude and the other elegant and refined. That fits with the meaning, which is:

Trying to raise Heidita's dander, are we?

That one went right over my head, samdie.

updated ENE 20, 2014
posted by 00bacfba
1
vote

James Santiago said:

...the coiner was referring to fu, a cat's hiss in Spanish, and fa, the fourth note on the musical scale. Both are sounds, with one being coarse and crude and the other elegant and refined. That fits with the meaning, which is:
Trying to raise Heidita's dander, are we'

updated ENE 20, 2014
posted by samdie
1
vote

Marco said:

No sé la significación de "ni fu ni fa" en español, pero creo que es familiar a chino. Tenemos "ni", "fu" y "fa" en chino.

I would be astonished if this phrase had anything to do with Chinese. I would guess that it was coined mainly because it sounds good, but it is possible that the coiner was referring to fu, a cat's hiss in Spanish, and fa, the fourth note on the musical scale. Both are sounds, with one being coarse and crude and the other elegant and refined. That fits with the meaning, which is:

  1. loc. col. Se usa para indicar que algo resulta indiferente:
    -¿qué tal la película? -ni fu ni fa.

Of course, the above conjecture is just that and nothing more, but I would have to see evidence of the Chinese connection to believe it.

I think this expression is often similar to así así.

updated ENE 20, 2014
posted by 00bacfba
1
vote

This is on wordreference as well

<http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php't=385070>

updated ENE 20, 2014
posted by Natasha
1
vote

No sé la significación de "ni fu ni fa" en español, pero creo que es familiar a chino. Tenemos "ni", "fu" y "fa" en chino. Es difícil decir qué significa sin contexto.

Marco

updated ENE 20, 2014
posted by Marco-T
1
vote

Uses that phrase as something that does not interest you or it does not matter, it is not common to use it, not what you'll find in the dictionary, there is no translation is an expression of depends on who speak

updated ENE 20, 2014
posted by Vicky
1
vote

but iv heared other meanings for it aswell

Vicky said:

Whatever, I do not careIt's expressions that are used in Spanish, in conversations between friends

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updated ENE 20, 2014
posted by PUNISHER
1
vote

Whatever, I do not care

It's expressions that are used in Spanish, in conversations between friends

updated ENE 20, 2014
posted by Vicky
1
vote

Don't know, but Heidita used this expression on the forum before. [url=http://my.spanishdict.com/forum/topic/show'id=1710195%3ATopic%3A437050&page=1&commentId=1710195%3AComment%3A438179&x=1#1710195Comment438179]Look here.[/url]

updated ENE 20, 2014
posted by Natasha