HomeQ&ASo Frustrating!

So Frustrating!

1
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I thought Spanish was going to be easy , Its not =(

I got the Feminine and Masculine down. I think the hardest part is everyone seems to speak Spanish differently depending on where they are from. Words have one meaning in Honduras and a totally different meaning in Mexico or Spain......Uggggggggggg!

I have a lady who works for me who is Mexican. I told her today that all Latinos needed to get together and agree on one form so I can learn easier. ;p ( I'm J/K )

Reading and writing Spanish seems to be a lot easier then pronouncing for me as well. I have a speech impediment that I have had since childhood so I think that makes it harder for me. I'm trying to start simple, Greetings, counting, colors etc. Id also like to try things like, today, tomorrow, yesterday etc. I haven't found a lesson for that yet.

It might be a dumb question, but do I have to buy a special keyboard to be able to use the accents correctly?

Well back to work. Hasta Luego!

3080 views
updated NOV 21, 2009
posted by Kim

8 Answers

0
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The grammar can be confusing because sometimes it is more nuanced than English. For example one word can many unrelated meaning and it can be hard to make sure you're using it in the right way. Take llevar for example. You probably learned as meaning to wear, but it can also to take, and to carry.

Learning a foriegn language is never easy just ask that Mexican woman about learning English and she will probably tell you the same thing. The only way to improving your speaking, is to actually speak. I know it hard because you want to sound competent. If you can't do it person at first , try it online. Develop your vocabulary too, because you won't able to speak if you don't the words.

Listen to Lazurus, he's native and an expert on Spanish grammar.

updated NOV 21, 2009
posted by BellaMargarita
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Hi Kim, I'm thinking there ought to be a forum or somewhere where we can sound off when we get frustrated or just fed up, and hopefully also find inspiration and some humor to motivate us to carry on. No it's not easy. At least you know you're not the only one.

updated NOV 11, 2008
posted by Mz-Badger
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I can think the same about English, you use a lot slang as well . Take it easy Kim, You must say them : Español sin modismos, por favor. No slang please.
¡Santo remedio!.( cure for all ).

updated NOV 11, 2008
posted by picoroco
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I as well had alot of trouble. I as well have a speech impediment. I did not let that hold me back though. I learned for about 8 months and was pretty good. I just couldn't understand very well, but could say almost anything I wanted although it would be very basic and not 100% clear all the times depending on my vocabulary on the subject. Understanding spanish is the hardest thing for me. reading and writing are simple in my humble opinion, but keep trying and you'll get it.

updated NOV 11, 2008
posted by rj
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Kim,
No Spanish Is NOT Easy! I understand where you are coming from. I am new at learning Spanish too. I also can read Spanish better that speaking it. I am working on my writing because if I can write it correctly then I can at least say the right words. They might not clear but I will get my point across. Hang in there we will make it! The lessons here are very good.

Zan

updated NOV 11, 2008
posted by ztaylor
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The regional differences relate to pronunciation (and usually involve systematic/consistent changes) or the variations in vocabulary tend to be more extensive and irregular/unpredictable. However, most of the latter involve using different words rather than using the same word with a different meaning (although that does happen too). The vocabulary problem is by no means unique to Spanish. Consider (an example that comes to mind) in the deep south (Louisiana, say) one speaks of "crawdad" where in most of the rest of U.S. on would say "crayfish".

But they all agree on how to conjugate verbs, which nouns are masculine/feminine, agreement of adjectives with nouns, verb/subject agreement with regard to number, etc. In short, the differences between the Spanish as spoken in various countries is certainly no greater that that between the English as spoken by Americans and the English (or even, the Australians).

updated NOV 10, 2008
posted by samdie
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HI Kim, look at this thread about typing accents...and other resources.

[url=http://my.spanishdict.com/forum/topic/show'id=1710195%3ATopic%3A329534]http://my.spanishdict.com/forum/topic/show'id=1710195%3ATopic%3A329534[/url]

updated NOV 10, 2008
posted by 00494d19
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Regional words and expressions are bound to be different in different countries, but the same can be said for any other language, included English. Proper written Spanish, on the other hand, is so uniform in spelling, grammar and meaning, that it is extremely difficult (or impossible) to tell in what country a novel or a textbook has been written. So, although spoken colloquial Spanish can change a lot, standard Spanish is understood everywhere without problems. I've never had the slightest problem to talk to anyone from any Spanish speaking country yet.

Regarding the keyboard, you have some suggestions [url=http://my.spanishdict.com/forum/topic/show'id=1710195%3ATopic%3A326492]here[/url]. You don't have to buy a new keyboard.

updated NOV 10, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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