HomeQ&Aestes and estaras the differences

estes and estaras the differences

0
votes

Hi! I am trying to understand the differences between estes and estaras, could help me understand it and give me some more examples as well?

Hola, me gustaria a saber las differencias entre estes y estaras, podia alguien ayudarme comprender este, especialmente dame mas ejemplos como usarlo.

How about this?

estaras junto a mi
la ansiedad de que estés junto a mí

4078 views
updated NOV 10, 2008
posted by duy

8 Answers

0
votes

Here are the lyrics properly written.

Me muerdo los labios al no poderte besar
Pienso estremece al no poderte tocar
Hoy por fin esta noche estarás junto a mí
Olvida la vanidad, el orgullo déjalo afuera
Que esta noche sensual y bohemia es por la ansiedad de que estés junto a mí.

Finally, tonight you will be with me
Forget about vanity, and leave your pride outside
This sensual and bohemian night, it's because of my anxiety over your being with me.

Something like that. Lyrics can be tough to translate.

updated NOV 10, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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Thank you for for the replies. The complete sentences are below(from the song "el liston de tu pelo"). So does the second one expresses uncertainty? Or both expresses the same thing that you will be with me.

hoy por fin esta noche estaras junto a mi

Olvida la vanidad, y el orgullo déjalo a fuera
que ésta noche sensual y bohemia es por la ansiedad
de que estés junto a mí

lazarus1907 said:

James Santiago said:

Based on the above conclusion, there was uncertainty, because it is a future event. Of course, "la ansiedad de que estés junto a mí" doesn't have to be translated with the future, and could be translated with the present tense instead. But as I said, it seemed to me that Duy was confused because the English translations were the same (hence the examples I gave). We'll have to see if my assumption was correct.

"Estarás junto a mí" can be easily translated as "You'll be with me" or even "You'll probably be with me", but I can't translate the second part one unless someone gives me the whole sentence; written as it is, you can only guess how to translate it. Actually, the first idea that came to my mind was to assume that the second one refers to the present (that was just my guess, of course), and in that case, I couldn't see any uncertainty.

The thing is, when I hear "la ansiedad de que estés junto a mí", as a native, I feel no uncertainty or anything else - only the need for someone to finish the sentence to make sense out of it, as nothing definite has been stated yet.

>

updated NOV 10, 2008
posted by duy
0
votes

James Santiago said:

Based on the above conclusion, there was uncertainty, because it is a future event. Of course, "la ansiedad de que estés junto a mí" doesn't have to be translated with the future, and could be translated with the present tense instead. But as I said, it seemed to me that Duy was confused because the English translations were the same (hence the examples I gave). We'll have to see if my assumption was correct.

"Estarás junto a mí" can be easily translated as "You'll be with me" or even "You'll probably be with me", but I can't translate the second part one unless someone gives me the whole sentence; written as it is, you can only guess how to translate it. Actually, the first idea that came to my mind was to assume that the second one refers to the present (that was just my guess, of course), and in that case, I couldn't see any uncertainty.

The thing is, when I hear "la ansiedad de que estés junto a mí", as a native, I feel no uncertainty or anything else - only the need for someone to finish the sentence to make sense out of it, as nothing definite has been stated yet.

updated NOV 10, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

Lazarus, you just have to accept that this is how beginners are taught the subjunctive. I understand that it is not that simple (and I explicitly said as much), but we can't teach people how to use the subjunctive on this forum; we can only answer specific questions.

It was my conclusion that Duy was confused by these because they translate the same in English, so I was trying to give him something he could grasp, in the absence of the hours of study and practice that are the only path to subjunctive enlightenment.

Based on the above conclusion, there was uncertainty, because it is a future event. Of course, "la ansiedad de que estés junto a mí" doesn't have to be translated with the future, and could be translated with the present tense instead. But as I said, it seemed to me that Duy was confused because the English translations were the same (hence the examples I gave).

We'll have to see if my assumption was correct.

updated NOV 10, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

James Santiago said:

but in a nutshell the subjunctive expresses uncertainty here.

I know we have different views about how to understand the subjunctive, but I have to disagree here, because in a sentence like:

La ansiedad de que estés junto a mí no me deja respirar.

the person who says this is 100% certain that the other one is here.

Paulina said:

it's present subjunctive, and it's usually for sentences that express uncertainty or probability

All tenses in Spanish can express uncertainty or probability:

Probablemente viene mañana (probability)
Probablemente vendrá mañana (probability)
Probablemente vendría mañana (probability)
... probablemente venía mañana (probability)
... probablemente viniera mañana (probability)

Uncertainty can be expressed with all tenses:

Ignoro si viene mañana (uncertainty)
Ignoro si vendrá mañana (uncertainty)
Ignoro si venía mañana (uncertainty)

And subjunctive can easily express certainty too:

Me alegra que estés aquí (it is certain that you are here).

updated NOV 10, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

In these two contexts, both translate identically in English, to "you will be with me." But as explained by others, one is future tense and one is present subjunctive. The difference is too complicated to explain here (see a good grammar text), but in a nutshell the subjunctive expresses uncertainty here.

Other examples:

Comprarás el coche.
You will buy the car.
Espero que compres el coche.
I hope you will buy the car.

No vendrán.
They won't come.
Temo que no vengan.
I'm afraid that they won't come.

updated NOV 10, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

hey, well, 'estarás' is in future tense, it literally means 'you will be' (estarás is conjugated in second person, 'tu' or you), for example: 'estarás en mi corazón' (you will be in my heart)
estés is hard to explain, it's present subjunctive, and it's usually for sentences that express uncertainty or probability, for example 'espero que estés bien' (I hope you are ok), '¿Crees que todavía estén vivos? (You think they're still alive'), 'espero que estemos juntos para siempre' (I hope we stay together forever)

we also use it a lot with the word 'cuando' (when), for example:
avísame cuando estés listo (let me know when you are ready)
No fumes cuando estés en mi casa (don't smoke when you are in my house)

here are all the possible conjugations for the verb 'estar' (to be):
http://www.tomisimo.org/conjugate/estar
I hope you find this information useful smile

updated NOV 9, 2008
posted by paulina3
0
votes

"estarás" is future tense indicative, and it is used to make predictions.
"estés" is present subjunctive, and it is used like any other subjunctive form: when you mention it, but it is not something you want to say to inform others about, i.e. you don't really mean to inform that "(tú) estás junto a mí" (you are with me).

updated NOV 9, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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