Look at...the telephone, the floor, the border

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Hello again, just had a quick question about telling someone to look at something.

"Look at the border!"

Would it be, "¡Mira la frontera!", or "¡Mirar en la frontera", or something similar'

1936 views
updated NOV 12, 2008
posted by Dale

12 Answers

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tad said:

Her avatar, Samdie, her avatar. I deny any knowledge of Heidita's underwear usage!


In that case, I would suggest "I change it (like my underpants) every Sunday ... not as often as Heidita it would seem." Still some ambiguity but less, I'd say. jeje

updated NOV 12, 2008
posted by samdie
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tad said:

Eddy said:

tad said:

By the way frontera is a border in the sense of 'frontier' (as your other items are household items) I'm not sure what the border of a room is called. 'borde'?

Hi tad

I was born in London, in the East End. Never heard the phrase "border of a room". We just called it the walls, las paredes, jeje

We would say the walls in North London too. wink

West Ham or Leyton Orient Eddie?

Unfortunately neither. It was Charlton, the other side of the river. Had to follow my father's team.

updated NOV 12, 2008
posted by Eddy
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Her avatar, Samdie, her avatar. I deny any knowledge of Heidita's underwear usage!

updated NOV 12, 2008
posted by tad
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tad said:

I change it every Sunday....like my underpants. grin
Well if Heidita started a thread about the frequency with which she changes her underwear, the moderators were quite right to have deleted it.

updated NOV 11, 2008
posted by samdie
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Natasha said:

tad, what is this, a new avatar every day? .


I change it every Sunday....like my underpants. grin

...not as often as Heidita it would seem.

updated NOV 11, 2008
posted by tad
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Eddy said:

tad said:

By the way frontera is a border in the sense of 'frontier' (as your other items are household items) I'm not sure what the border of a room is called. 'borde'?

Hi tad

I was born in London, in the East End. Never heard the phrase "border of a room". We just called it the walls, las paredes, jeje


We would say the walls in North London too. wink
West Ham or Leyton Orient Eddie'

updated NOV 11, 2008
posted by tad
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If you mean "look at" in the literal sense of using your eyes to perceive something, it would be mira, but if you mean it in the sense of thinking about something as an example ("Look at Herbert Hoover"), then it would be something else. I have a hard time imagining a situation where I would need to say "Mira la frontera."

As for using the infinitive mirar for a command, yes, it can be done, but that is usually a formal way of saying something, such as on a sign: No fumar.

updated NOV 10, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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Ha, well I mean "border" as in, for example the border dividing two countries.

For example, the Canadian-American border.

updated NOV 10, 2008
posted by Dale
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tad, what is this, a new avatar every day?

Dale, what DO you mean by the border of a room? A wallpaper border or what?

I'm thinking of orilla or parte externa, but not sure . . .

updated NOV 10, 2008
posted by Natasha
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tad said:

By the way frontera is a border in the sense of 'frontier' (as your other items are household items) I'm not sure what the border of a room is called. 'borde'?

Hi tad
I was born in London, in the East End. Never heard the phrase "border of a room". We just called it the walls, las paredes, jeje

updated NOV 9, 2008
posted by Eddy
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By the way frontera is a border in the sense of 'frontier' (as your other items are household items) I'm not sure what the border of a room is called. 'borde''

updated NOV 8, 2008
posted by tad
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Mirar means 'look at' so no further prepositions are required.
So "¡Mira la frontera!" (tú)
'Mire la frontera!" (usted)

Just another question for someone, am I right in thinking that people sometimes say ¡Mirar la frontera! instead of 'Mirad la frontera' (vosotros)

updated NOV 8, 2008
posted by tad