4,8 ?

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In the Educación Secundaria Matemáticas book, there is a problem about the price of a bag of oranges. I found the same problem here on page 4, except that it´s a box of oranges.

How would you read aloud 4,8 '? "cuatro y ocho décimo euros"? "cuatro coma ocho euros"?

If memory serves correctly, on Mi Vida Loca they said, for example, "cuatro con cincuenta" for 4 Euros and 50 cents.

Is this just written this way because it's in a math problem? Do signs in stores actually say 4,8 ? (rather than 4,80 ')?

1607 views
updated NOV 4, 2008
posted by Natasha

8 Answers

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3. La fracción del euro recibe los nombres de céntimo (? céntimo) y cent (? cent). Para referirse a la fracción del euro no debe usarse el término centavo (? centavo).

Thanks. So, what is the plural of "cent" in Spanish? "Una moneda de 50 ___|_"'

updated NOV 4, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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Probably James is thinking in terms of chemistry, where they have their own rules for significant digits and precision.

As a math teacher, I think of 0.8 and 0.80 as identical in every respect.

Have the police blocked your number yet? grin

lazarus1907 said:

Natasha said:

Well, practice is another matter. (Try tutoring Basic Math sometime.)

I have done thousands of hours of Basic Math tutoring in my life; I was half joking about everyone knowing the difference, but when I was younger everyone knew that kind of things.

James Santiago said:

No, not really. 0.80 is more precise than 0.8. 0.8 might have been rounded from 0.78, but 0.80 could not have been rounded from 0.78.

When people write down the price, they are not rounding: 4,8 ? means 4,80 ', not a pence more or less. If they try to charge me 4,81 ? I simply call the police.

>

updated NOV 4, 2008
posted by Natasha
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From the RAE'S Dictionary of Doubts (I looked this up earlier before posting the question):

3. La fracción del euro recibe los nombres de céntimo (? céntimo) y cent (? cent). Para referirse a la fracción del euro no debe usarse el término centavo (? centavo).

James Santiago said:

If they try to charge me 4,81 ? I simply call the police.

Wow, you're a no-nonsense guy, aren't you? wink

By the way, how do you say 0.01 ? in Spanish (cent or eurocent in English)? Centavo?

>

updated NOV 4, 2008
posted by Natasha
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If they try to charge me 4,81 ? I simply call the police.

Wow, you're a no-nonsense guy, aren't you? wink

By the way, how do you say 0.01 ? in Spanish (cent or eurocent in English)? Centavo'

updated NOV 4, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

Natasha said:

Well, practice is another matter. (Try tutoring Basic Math sometime.)

I have done thousands of hours of Basic Math tutoring in my life; I was half joking about everyone knowing the difference, but when I was younger everyone knew that kind of things.

James Santiago said:

No, not really. 0.80 is more precise than 0.8. 0.8 might have been rounded from 0.78, but 0.80 could not have been rounded from 0.78.

When people write down the price, they are not rounding: 4,8 ? means 4,80 ', not a pence more or less. If they try to charge me 4,81 ? I simply call the police.

updated NOV 4, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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in theory everyone should know that 0,80 is the same as 0.8, right'

No, not really. 0.80 is more precise than 0.8. 0.8 might have been rounded from 0.78, but 0.80 could not have been rounded from 0.78.

Natasha, I know nothing about your question as pertains to euros and Europe, but here in the US, I usually hear people say it just like in English.

$4.80 = cuatro ochenta.
$7.53 = siete cincuenta y tres

This may be due to the influence of English, of course.

updated NOV 4, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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Well, practice is another matter. (Try tutoring Basic Math sometime.)

In English, if a price was listed as $4.8, we would actually wonder if it meant $4.08, $4.80, or something else, because it is considered wrong to leave off the hundredths place for dollar amounts. You clarified my question about the euros, though. I can say "cuatro con ochenta." Thanks!!

lazarus1907 said:

In Spain most people in the shops probably say "cuatro euros (con) ochenta". I've never paid attention to the last zero, but I guess that it doesn't matter: in theory everyone should know that 0,80 is the same as 0.8, right? (I am a bit naive).

>

updated NOV 4, 2008
posted by Natasha
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In Spain most people in the shops probably say "cuatro euros (con) ochenta". I've never paid attention to the last zero, but I guess that it doesn't matter: in theory everyone should know that 0,80 is the same as 0.8, right? (I am a bit naive).

updated NOV 4, 2008
posted by lazarus1907