I'm still not understanding "pa' "

1
vote

I've only ever come across it in reading song lyrics, but I can't figure out what it means.

"La gente buena / Solo goza nunca hay pena / pa que sufrir? "

"Mira que bonita, que puede ser la vida ahorita / aprovechemos que nos brinda la compañia tuya y mia / que esta casa necesita de ti pa' que este mas bonita "

"Pa' una ciudad del norte / Yo me fui a trabajar" (

2418 views
updated AGO 2, 2011
posted by Casey

8 Answers

0
votes

ah okay, thanks so much!

updated NOV 4, 2008
posted by Casey
0
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hola!

updated NOV 4, 2008
posted by Casey
0
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HI Casey, the word "pa" is simply an abbreviation of para, in all kind of different meanings:

voy pa' tu casa: towards/to your home/house acepcion

Esto es pa' ti: this is for you

¿Pa' qué? What for/Why'

updated NOV 4, 2008
posted by 00494d19
0
votes

One set of podcasts I listen to has a listeners question and answer section which they call
«pa' que sepas»
'In order that you know'; I guess 'Just so ya know' might be the analagous phrase.

updated NOV 4, 2008
posted by tad
0
votes

In Spoken Spanish (and songs) is common even in Spain.

updated NOV 4, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
0
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it's real common in letters and emails.

Casey said:

is it common though? normal for speaking spanish to shorten para, to 'pa'? or is it a lyric thing, to make the line fit the rhythm...?

Quentin said:

You've heard these or read these lyrics? It seems that it could be para.

>

updated NOV 4, 2008
posted by The-Steve
0
votes

is it common though? normal for speaking spanish to shorten para, to 'pa'? or is it a lyric thing, to make the line fit the rhythm...?

Quentin said:

You've heard these or read these lyrics? It seems that it could be para.

>

updated NOV 4, 2008
posted by Casey
0
votes

You've heard these or read these lyrics? It seems that it could be para.

http://www.songmeanings.net/songs/view/3530822107858565892/

If you look at this site you will see the Pa', but also note that special characters as well as normal characters are wrong throughout the translation.

la genter buena
solo goza, nunca hay pena
pa' qu? sufrir
In the original link that you see when you google this line, it is translated.

"good people, only have fun (gozar is just "to have fun"), there's never sorrow... why suffer'"

The why suffer leads me to believe that it is ¿Para qué...'

updated NOV 4, 2008
posted by 0074b507