HomeQ&ATo Thine Own Self Be True

To Thine Own Self Be True

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This isn't a Spanish related question so I hope I'm not drummed out of the corps for asking.

What does "To Thine Own Self Be True" mean to you'

5966 views
updated NOV 3, 2008
posted by Erin

13 Answers

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Quentin said:

Example of being drummed out of the Corps. From TV show "Branded".
There was also a film called "White Feather(s)" which devoted more than 5 minutes (a lot of footage) to the drumming out of a soldier for cowardice. (with real drums)

updated NOV 3, 2008
posted by samdie
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<http://www.youtube.com/watch'v=uV-7D4io1Rs>

Example of being drummed out of the Corps. From TV show "Branded".

Heidita said:

Erin, your question is perfectly ok.Hi Erin, fascinating: I have just seen two or rather three new sayings:To Thine Own Self Be True.I think this must be very old fashioned. thine is not used any more. I would have interpreted it as James. And His word is law, as we say in Spanish.We might just as well try to find a similar saying in Spanish.How about: Debes serte fiel a ti mismo. Seguro que hay algo mejor.I'm not drummed out of the corpsCan you explain this meaning'my shoot-from-the-hip answerJames, any suggestions for this in Spanish'hmm, ¿mi respuesta a bote pronto?

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updated NOV 3, 2008
posted by 0074b507
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Because I've found that people/friends have had a hard time putting into words just what it means (to them) to be true to themselves. And at times I wonder if they just say "I'm true to myself" but don't completely understand what that means or if it's different for each person.

James Santiago said:

Erin, may I ask why you want to know? Was there some doubt or argument over its meaning? I really can't think of any other possible interpretation.

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updated NOV 3, 2008
posted by Erin
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Erin, may I ask why you want to know? Was there some doubt or argument over its meaning? I really can't think of any other possible interpretation.

updated NOV 3, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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Yes, it's old, Skakespeare etc. Now days people will tell someone "just be true to yourself" So I'm asking what that means to each individual.

Heidita said:

Erin, your question is perfectly ok.

Hi Erin, fascinating: I have just seen two or rather three new sayings:

To Thine Own Self Be True.

I think this must be very old fashioned. thine is not used any more. I would have interpreted it as James. And His word is law, as we say in Spanish.

We might just as well try to find a similar saying in Spanish.

How about: Debes serte fiel a ti mismo. Seguro que hay algo mejor.

I'm not drummed out of the corps

Can you explain this meaning?

my shoot-from-the-hip answer

James, any suggestions for this in Spanish?

hmm, ¿mi respuesta a bote pronto?

>

updated NOV 3, 2008
posted by Erin
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Heidita said:

To Thine Own Self Be True.

I think this must be very old fashioned. thine is not used any more. I would have interpreted it as James. And His word is law, as we say in Spanish.


The credit for the original normally goes to Shakespeare. Obviously, a more up-to-date version could be "Be true to yourself!" (which one does hear). Some other possibilities in the same vein:
Stick to your guns!
March to the beat of your own drummer!
Don't follow the herd!
Be your own man (woman)!
(And, somewhat different but with meanings that overlap on the original):
Trust your instincts!
Keep the faith!

updated NOV 3, 2008
posted by samdie
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The standard Spanish translation of this Shakespearean line seems to be "Sé fiel a tí mismo."

"Shoot from the hip" comes from Western movies, in which a gun fighter would pull out his pistol and fire quickly, without taking time to aim. We use the phrase now to mean that we say something without giving it careful thought. Literally, "Mi contesta, sin pensarlo bién/mucho, sería..." I thought of "hablando mal y pronto," but that is a bit different, and is closer to "excuse my French."

updated NOV 3, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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Natasha said:

drummed out of the corps (a military analogy): her humorous way of suggesting she might be banned from the site

Years ago when a serviceman was dismissed from the forces for a wrong doing, it was generally done to the sound of drums to remind others watching of the consequences of "breaking the rules". This type of "dismissal ceremony" has long been stopped.

updated NOV 3, 2008
posted by Eddy
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drummed out of the corps (a military analogy):

her humorous way of suggesting she might be banned from the site

updated NOV 3, 2008
posted by Natasha
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Erin, your question is perfectly ok.

Hi Erin, fascinating: I have just seen two or rather three new sayings:

To Thine Own Self Be True.

I think this must be very old fashioned. thine is not used any more. I would have interpreted it as James. And His word is law, as we say in Spanish.

We might just as well try to find a similar saying in Spanish.

How about: Debes serte fiel a ti mismo. Seguro que hay algo mejor.

I'm not drummed out of the corps

Can you explain this meaning?

my shoot-from-the-hip answer

James, any suggestions for this in Spanish?

hmm, ¿mi respuesta a bote pronto'

updated NOV 3, 2008
posted by 00494d19
0
votes

James Santiago said:

It means to follow your own instincts or morals, rather than to do what you think will please others.

That's my shoot-from-the-hip answer (i.e., without actually researching it).
Well, that's certainly what is means when Polonius says it to his son (in Hamlet). He goes on to say "and it follows as night the day, thou canst not then be false to any man." (I'm not exactly shooting-from-the-hip but I am quoting from memory, so I may not have done the Bard full justice.)

updated NOV 3, 2008
posted by samdie
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It means to follow your own instincts or morals, rather than to do what you think will please others.

That's my shoot-from-the-hip answer (i.e., without actually researching it).

updated NOV 3, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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Question is OK, but your category should probably be "Greetings" or maybe "Culture."

It's almost lunchtime and I'm too hungry right now to engage in philosophical discussions, he he.

updated NOV 3, 2008
posted by Natasha
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