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Never too loud

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How can i write "never too loud" when it's about music? How about "Love is unkind"? I try to translate some songs...

2038 views
updated NOV 4, 2008
posted by Sana-Saari

7 Answers

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That´s funny because Suavecito conveys the opposite idea of what I understood from the English title. I was interpreting it as "Loud, but it could never be too loud (because we like it loud)."

Ah, I see. And given the context, yours might be the more likely interpretation. I took it to mean "never play music excessively loud." This may reflect my age.

However, I maintain that my interpretation follows most logically from what Sana said: "But it's about music, like they play never too loud, the music is never too loud."

But this does indeed point out how essential context is. Two native speakers can interpret the same English in opposite ways, with both versions being plausible and grammatically correct.

updated NOV 4, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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My dad tells a story about a comic strip which goes something like the following. (I tried to find it on google, but no such luck.) It illustrates the ambiguity of the "never too . . ." formulation in English.

--The head honcho at a nuclear reactor retired. He tells the people taking over, "You can never pour too much water on a runaway reactor."
--Next frame shows people panicking at the reactor site. "Get some water!" "No! He said you can't pour too much!" "No, he meant . . ."
--Final frame shows the retired director on a Pacific island, staring at a mushroom cloud in the distance and yelling, "I TOLD them you could never pour too much water on a runaway reactor!"

updated NOV 4, 2008
posted by Natasha
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That´s funny because Suavecito conveys the opposite idea of what I understood from the English title. I was interpreting it as "Loud, but it could never be too loud (because we like it loud)." I'm not at all suggesting that Suavecito is off track, just re-emphasizing the difficulty of translating a title.

James Santiago said:

This is difficult to translate, because the usual word word for loud in Spanish, alto, also means high, so a simple, literal translation (Nunca Demasiado Alto) could be misconstrued as "never too high." Furthermore, "too" is demasiado in Spanish, but that word is not used nearly as often as its English counterpart, and to me it doesn't sound good here.

Titles of artistic works should not be translated literally. Therefore, I propose that "Never too loud" might be rendered in Spanish as something like "Suavecito" or "Siempre Suavecito" for an album title.

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updated NOV 4, 2008
posted by Natasha
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Ok, thank you for your help. I'll keep translating...

updated NOV 4, 2008
posted by Sana-Saari
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This is difficult to translate, because the usual word word for loud in Spanish, alto, also means high, so a simple, literal translation (Nunca Demasiado Alto) could be misconstrued as "never too high." Furthermore, "too" is demasiado in Spanish, but that word is not used nearly as often as its English counterpart, and to me it doesn't sound good here.

Titles of artistic works should not be translated literally. Therefore, I propose that "Never too loud" might be rendered in Spanish as something like "Suavecito" or "Siempre Suavecito" for an album title.

updated NOV 4, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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votes

Hello, and thank you very much!

Never too loud is a name of the album, so there is no whole sentence. But it's about music, like they play never too loud, the music is never too loud or something like that.. Any help'

updated NOV 4, 2008
posted by Sana-Saari
0
votes

You need to give us a complete sentence. It's difficult to translate fragments like "never too loud."

"Love is unkind" = El amor es cruel

updated NOV 4, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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