HomeQ&Abatir récords

batir récords

0
votes

Estas elecciones, de hecho, según los sondeos y el voto previo, batirán récords de participación, lo que, para los modestos estándares de EEUU, puede suponer más del 60%, es decir unos 130 ó 135 millones de votantes.

This is a sentence from this article in elmundo.

break records . . . is "batirán récords" standard Spanish? Spanglish? What surprised me most was to see the plural of record formed that way in Spanish. How would you say this?

2026 views
updated NOV 4, 2008
posted by Natasha

13 Answers

1
vote

When I was a programmer, we routinely wrote ÿ for zero to avoid confusion. After becoming a math teacher, I had to stop because the students all thought it was funny.

lazarus1907 said:

motley said:

Whatever happened to ø ÿ for zero', I never see it anymore & it sure saved the confusion between zero & the letter o.

Traditionally, Spanish has always use the accent to make this distinction. The use of ÿ is only known to programmers.

>

updated MAR 3, 2010
posted by Natasha
1
vote

From English "record", from Latin "recordari" (remember). The plural of "récord" is regular, because although it ends the ending [vowel]+d changes to [vowel]+des, the ending [consonant]+d becomes [consonant]+ds. Ej. lords, rands, stands (all foreign words, by the way).

The accent on the "o" can be used if it appears between two numerical figures to prevent potential confusions with a zero, but it is not that useful if you type using a computer.

updated MAR 3, 2010
posted by lazarus1907
1
vote

Natasha said:

(And is the accent on 130 ó 135 a mistake')
Try double-clicking on "ó". jeje (notice the example with "o" between numbers).

updated MAR 3, 2010
posted by samdie
0
votes

Well, that explains it, I used to read the programs looking for errors that really messed things up, huge printouts, which I'm sure must be different today. So I just got used to ø for zero.

Natasha said:

When I was a programmer, we routinely wrote ÿ for zero to avoid confusion. After becoming a math teacher, I had to stop because the students all thought it was funny.

lazarus1907 said:

motley said:

Whatever happened to ø ÿ for zero', I never see it anymore & it sure saved the confusion between zero & the letter o.

Traditionally, Spanish has always use the accent to make this distinction. The use of ÿ is only known to programmers.

>

updated NOV 4, 2008
posted by motley
0
votes

Most people write them differently. The null symbol (used for empty sets, etc.) usually has a smaller circle and a longer line, if people are writing it by hand. Stole this image from Wikipedia:

updated NOV 4, 2008
posted by Natasha
0
votes

motley said:

Whatever happened to ø ÿ for zero', I never see it anymore & it sure saved the confusion between zero & the letter o.


The need largely disappeared when computers/keyboards/printers began to universally support both upper and lower case. In the "caps only" days it was, indeed, difficult to distinguish the number and letter. Also the earlier programming languages only supported upper case (when writing programs. Some of the newer languages not only support but require mixed cases and pretty much all of the older languages (that are still used) were retrofitted to permit upper/lower case.

updated NOV 4, 2008
posted by samdie
0
votes

When I was a programmer, we routinely wrote ÿ for zero to avoid confusion. After becoming a math teacher, I had to stop because the students all thought it was funny.

In mechanical engineering, it means diameter.

Furthermore, far be it from me to argue math with you two, but I thought this symbol meant null in math, and isn't null distinct from zero? Wikipedia says: Sometimes the symbol ? is used to distinguish "null" from 0.

updated NOV 4, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

motley said:

Whatever happened to ø ÿ for zero', I never see it anymore & it sure saved the confusion between zero & the letter o.

Traditionally, Spanish has always use the accent to make this distinction. The use of ÿ is only known to programmers.

updated NOV 4, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

Whatever happened to ø ÿ for zero', I never see it anymore & it sure saved the confusion between zero & the letter o.

updated NOV 4, 2008
posted by motley
0
votes

Sorry. I didn't see it before responding to Heidita's post. (Internet connection here is a bit flaky sometimes.)

lazarus1907 said:

Natasha said:

Interesting! OK, but how did récord become récords instead of récordes?

Read my post above.

>

updated NOV 4, 2008
posted by Natasha
0
votes

Interesting! OK, but how did récord become récords instead of récordes?

Heidita said:

Hola Nati: La palabra récord es muy común en español.

*récord.

(Del ingl. record).

  1. m. marca (? mejor resultado en el ejercicio de un deporte).

  2. m. Resultado máximo o mínimo en otras actividades. U. m. en apos.*

Y la expresión "batir un récord" también.

>

updated NOV 4, 2008
posted by Natasha
0
votes

Hola Nati: La palabra récord es muy común en español.

*récord.

(Del ingl. record).

  1. m. marca (? mejor resultado en el ejercicio de un deporte).

  2. m. Resultado máximo o mínimo en otras actividades. U. m. en apos.*

Y la expresión "batir un récord" también.

updated NOV 4, 2008
posted by 00494d19
0
votes

(And is the accent on 130 ó 135 a mistake')

updated NOV 4, 2008
posted by Natasha
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