así fuera

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I'm trying to translate the following sentences; "así fuera" is what confuses me.

la última aberración argentina en materia económica ha visto la luz. En España se preguntan si el gobierno argentino se ha vuelto loco, y S&P por las dudas que así fuera, preventivamente bajó la calificación de la deuda argentina.

The following is my attempt:

The latest Argentine [government] aberration in economic matters has come to light. In Spain they ask if the Argentine government has gone crazy, and S&P, because of doubts thus surfaced ("outed'"), lowered Argentina's debt rating [as a precautionary measure].

--TIA, bg

1681 views
updated NOV 4, 2008
posted by Guillermo-Gris

4 Answers

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Natasha said:

Based on the news today, I assume this article had to do with Argentina's plan (threat') to nationalize the private pension system. In that case, could we translate it like this? S&P, fearing that such would be, lowered the rating.

Thanks for your help. You are quite right; the article was mainly about Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner's plan to seize private pension assets, but also mentioned in passing the agro-export taxes and restrictions of a few months ago. Perhaps Ms Fernandez is trying to become Evita II (Maria Eva Duarte de Peron). I try to keep up with political and economic news from S.A., especially the countries I've visited. The only way to do that is to read it in the original. My impression is that the author of this e-letter, latinforme, writes quite elegantly.

updated NOV 4, 2008
posted by Guillermo-Gris
0
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Based on the news today, I assume this article had to do with Argentina's plan (threat') to nationalize the private pension system. In that case, could we translate it like this? S&P, fearing that such would be, lowered the rating.

updated NOV 4, 2008
posted by Natasha
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Out of context,

así fuera = it were that way (i.e. they've gone crazy)

A possible translation:

...and S&P, because they feared that this could be true,

Not exactly the same, but it is close enough. Now you can improve on that using "doubt", if you can.

Natasha said:

Confuses me too . . . if fuera is the past subjunctive of ser, why doesn't it agree with dudas'?

Becuase grammatically speaking, there is a "de" missing: "... las dudas de que así fuera...": they should have specified with this "de" with kind of doubts they had. That's why there is no agreement.

updated NOV 4, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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Confuses me too . . . if fuera is the past subjunctive of ser, why doesn't it agree with dudas''

updated NOV 4, 2008
posted by Natasha