HomeQ&ACasa and Hogar

Casa and Hogar

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Casa has the meaning of house; how does it differ from hogar if any'

26693 views
updated OCT 30, 2008
posted by Cooly-High

33 Answers

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James Santiago said:

Pretty much the same as house and home. Hogar literally means hearth, so it conjures up an image of a snug, warm, and safe haven.


Then again, there was a book (written by a well-known madam some 40-50 years ago) entitled "A House Is Not a Home"

updated DIC 9, 2010
posted by samdie
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Sorry, when I answered this, it had a nil reply on my forum. Bloody Broadband. Do you know that in some parts of what is considered the "Third World", they are working on 100mb of broadband.

updated OCT 30, 2008
posted by Eddy
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I should add that "climb up on" and "climb upon" are not pronounced the same.

updated OCT 30, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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látigo said:

Mi amigo James, Could we just use the preposition "upon" - He climbed upon the table?

James Santiago said:

Natasha, there doesn't seem to be a concise way to express "home in on" in Spanish. Obviously, the concept can be expressed, but the translation would probably vary with the context. In the example you gave, "The missile homed in on the target," we might say something like "El misil fue acercándose al blanco." I say this because, as you know, "home in on" means (in a military context) to use a guidance system to approach a target.As for the multiple prepositions, we have many verbs like this. The reason is that the phrasal verb is "home in," which as a unit means "to approach," but if we want to use an object for the verb, we need another preposition, "on" in this case. Another example is "He climbed up on the table." "Climb up" is a phrasal verb with a meaning that is distinct from that of "climb" ("He climbed on the table" could mean something slightly different), and "on the table" gives the location of the verb action.

I know this is addressed to James but the word "upon" has a more formal feel in English as in "once upon a time" and "upon my word". It is also used in phrases such as "row upon row of seats" and "Christmas is almost upon us". It depends I suppose on how you want to convey the "on"

updated OCT 30, 2008
posted by Eddy
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Hola, Whip.

Yes, we can say "upon," but it sounds very formal and stiff. Plus, "upon" is just a synonym for "on," so it has the same problems as that word. That is, "He climbed on (or upon) the table" could be interpreted to mean that while he was sitting or standing on the table, he climbed to a higher point. Of course, this interpretation is unlikely, and a person would normally understand the sentence to mean that he raised himself up onto the table from the floor, but using "climbed up on" or "climbed onto" eliminates the ambiguity.

These phrasal verbs (verb plus particle) are by far the most difficult aspect of English for foreigners. They are often completely non-intuitive, and therefore must be memorized. They are especially difficult when an adverb and a preposition are used together, as follows.

Let's get it over with = Vamos a salir de esto
We got off to a good start = Empezamos con bien pie

updated OCT 30, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
0
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Mi amigo James,
Could we just use the preposition "upon" - He climbed upon the table?

James Santiago said:

Natasha, there doesn't seem to be a concise way to express "home in on" in Spanish. Obviously, the concept can be expressed, but the translation would probably vary with the context. In the example you gave, "The missile homed in on the target," we might say something like "El misil fue acercándose al blanco." I say this because, as you know, "home in on" means (in a military context) to use a guidance system to approach a target.As for the multiple prepositions, we have many verbs like this. The reason is that the phrasal verb is "home in," which as a unit means "to approach," but if we want to use an object for the verb, we need another preposition, "on" in this case. Another example is "He climbed up on the table." "Climb up" is a phrasal verb with a meaning that is distinct from that of "climb" ("He climbed on the table" could mean something slightly different), and "on the table" gives the location of the verb action.

>

updated OCT 30, 2008
posted by ltigo
0
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Natasha, there doesn't seem to be a concise way to express "home in on" in Spanish. Obviously, the concept can be expressed, but the translation would probably vary with the context. In the example you gave, "The missile homed in on the target," we might say something like "El misil fue acercándose al blanco." I say this because, as you know, "home in on" means (in a military context) to use a guidance system to approach a target.

As for the multiple prepositions, we have many verbs like this. The reason is that the phrasal verb is "home in," which as a unit means "to approach," but if we want to use an object for the verb, we need another preposition, "on" in this case. Another example is "He climbed up on the table." "Climb up" is a phrasal verb with a meaning that is distinct from that of "climb" ("He climbed on the table" could mean something slightly different), and "on the table" gives the location of the verb action.

updated OCT 30, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
0
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I am waiting for someone to ask why we string all those words together, "in on" . . .

Thanks for the translation.

Eddy said:

Hi Natasha

I think the phrase to be used would be "to home in on" which would equate to something like "dirigirse hacia"

>

updated OCT 30, 2008
posted by Natasha
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Natasha said:

Are you trying to get the thread deleted? I still have a legitimate question here . . . how to say homing in.

From dictionary.com:

home (verb - used without object)

  1. (of guided missiles, aircraft, etc.) to proceed, esp. under control of an automatic aiming mechanism, toward a specified target, as a plane, missile, or location (often fol. by in on): The missile homed in on the target.

  2. to navigate toward a point by means of coordinates other than those given by altitudes.

(I know a person who was a pilot in WW II in Europe, and he tells a great story about having to navigate by the radio homing beacons.)

Gus said:

Hablando de casas, Yo encontré una que era requetebuena Pero el truco era espera hasta los últimos días del mes porque los soldados no tenia dinero y las mujeres bajan los precios. jajaja or as we say up north jojojo

Hi Natasha
I think a phrase that could be used would be "to home in on" which would equate to something like "dirigirse hacia". One could also use buscar el blanco - to home in on the target. Concentrarse en el blanco could be another.

updated OCT 30, 2008
posted by Eddy
0
votes

Are you trying to get the thread deleted?

I still have a legitimate question here . . . how to say homing in.

From dictionary.com:
home (verb - used without object)

  1. (of guided missiles, aircraft, etc.) to proceed, esp. under control of an automatic aiming mechanism, toward a specified target, as a plane, missile, or location (often fol. by in on): The missile homed in on the target.
  2. to navigate toward a point by means of coordinates other than those given by altitudes.

(I know a person who was a pilot in WW II in Europe, and he tells a great story about having to navigate by the radio homing beacons.)

Gus said:

Hablando de casas, Yo encontré una que era requetebuena Pero el truco era espera hasta los últimos días del mes porque los soldados no tenia dinero y las mujeres bajan los precios. jajaja or as we say up north jojojo

>

updated OCT 30, 2008
posted by Natasha
0
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Hablando de casas, Yo encontré una que era requetebuena
Pero el truco era espera hasta los últimos días del mes porque los soldados no tenia dinero y las mujeres bajan los precios.
jajaja or as we say up north jojojo

updated OCT 30, 2008
posted by 00769608
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oopps, I thought that you were talking about non pure meaning non virgens

Gus said:

In the name of all the impurist in the world, I thank you.jajaja or as we say up north jo,jo,jo

samdie said:

Natasha said:

Uh . . . in reference to Dionne Warwick, I think "madam" was intended in a slightly different vein, but I'll let you be the judge. samdie has a rather unusual sense of humor . . . Or if he meant Polly Adler, who wrote the book, then she was clearly the madam of a brothel.

I was referring, of course, to Polly Adler but I wasn't sure if James was old enough (and you certainly aren't) to recognize the reference. However, given the skills that you both have demonstrated for finding information on the web, I guess that I shouldn't be surprised.As for your use of the "b" word, I'm surprised that there's still a thread to which one can reply (or "which one can reply to" [for the impurists]).

>

updated OCT 30, 2008
posted by 00769608
0
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In the name of all the impurist in the world, I thank you.
jajaja or as we say up north jo,jo,jo

samdie said:

Natasha said:

Uh . . . in reference to Dionne Warwick, I think "madam" was intended in a slightly different vein, but I'll let you be the judge. samdie has a rather unusual sense of humor . . . Or if he meant Polly Adler, who wrote the book, then she was clearly the madam of a brothel.

I was referring, of course, to Polly Adler but I wasn't sure if James was old enough (and you certainly aren't) to recognize the reference. However, given the skills that you both have demonstrated for finding information on the web, I guess that I shouldn't be surprised.As for your use of the "b" word, I'm surprised that there's still a thread to which one can reply (or "which one can reply to" [for the impurists]).

>

updated OCT 30, 2008
posted by 00769608
0
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Where did you get that? That meaning for hogar is not in our dictionary, nor in the Dictionary of the RAE. In fact, our site dictionary doesn't translate home as a verb at all. The closest I could get was this:

homing device -> sistema (m) de guiado pasivo (of missile)

homing pigeon -> paloma (f) mensajera

So . . . how COULD we say something like this?

During WW II, planes used radio beams to navigate and home in on their point of return.

sherman said:

hogar meaning is home (the adjective) as in you home in on a radio station........casa is house (the noun)

Cooly High said:

Bienvenido al hogar

>

updated OCT 30, 2008
posted by Natasha
0
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hogar meaning is home (the adjective) as in you home in on a radio station........casa is house (the noun)

Cooly High said:

Bienvenido al hogar

>

updated OCT 29, 2008
posted by sherman
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