dress up as

0
votes

"What are you going to dress up as'"
"What are you going to be (for Halloween)'"

Estas son preguntas frecuentes a esta altura del año aquí en EEUU. Puedo traducirlas en varias maneras, pero ¿cuál sería la manera más natural? Sé que Halloween no se celebra en otros países, pero la pregunta podría usarse en cualquier caso en que uno se disfraza.

2964 views
updated OCT 28, 2008
posted by 00bacfba

9 Answers

0
votes

sheldon said:

Hey James. how is everything with you . This is Sheldon. i was wondering if you arent too busy you could reply to my disscussion.

Hi, Sheldon. I'm fine, thanks.

It's best to send notes such as this privately, by going to the person's page and leaving a comment. (I'm posting this publicly so others may benefit.)

I did see your latest question, but I think I'll let someone else help you out. The whole situation seems too weird to me. No offense!

Best of luck,

updated OCT 28, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

Irina said:

Okay...muchas gracias...en mi clase no estudio pensaba, estaba, y otras verbos en este tiempo...para que es este tiempo?

This tense is called imperfect, and it is used when you don't want to mention the end of the action, or you can't. It is like the present of the past.

If at some point in the past you say: "I am thinking of dressing up...", and you want to describe that moment from your present perspective, since you used the present tense in the past, you use the imperfect now: you bring the past to the present from your thoughts (or memories). You don't want to mention the end of thinking about dressing up, but while it is still going on... in the past.

With "pensé", you contemplate the whole action of thinking about dressing up, after you stopped thinking about it... in the past; maybe after you changed your mind about it, or after Halloween'

updated OCT 28, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

Okay...muchas gracias...en mi clase no estudio pensaba, estaba, y otras verbos en este tiempo...para que es este tiempo'

updated OCT 28, 2008
posted by Irina
0
votes

Thanks, Sally and Lazarus.

Irina wrote:
*No celebro Haloween...pero piensé que me pinto negro y después pintando "huesos" blancos porque no tengo disfraces.

Digo correcto'*

Not quite.

De verdad no celebro Halloween (ya se me pasó)...pero pensaba pintarme de negro y después pintar huesos blancos ya que no tengo disfraces.

updated OCT 28, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

¿De qué te vas a disfrazar? (or "se va")
¿De qué vas a ir (disfrazado/da)? (or "va")

Voy a ir (disfrazado) de fantasma. (most common)
Voy a llevar un disfraz de pirata. (less common)

Yo mismo he dicho estas frases alguna que otra vez... para el Carnaval en España.

updated OCT 28, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

Muchas gracias...

No celebro Haloween...pero piensé que me pinto negro y después pintando "huesos" blancos porque no tengo disfraces.

Digo correcto'

updated OCT 28, 2008
posted by Irina
0
votes

¿Quieres decir que vas a salir pintada, pero por lo demás desnuda?

pintar
hueso
disfraz (disfraces)

updated OCT 28, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

I don't really celebrate halloween (grew out of it)...but I thought of painting myself black and then painting white "bones" since I have no costumes.

No celebro Halloween....pero piensé que me "painting" negro y después "painting" "bones" blancos porque no tengo "costumes".

Y ¿como se dice "to paint", "bone", y "costumes" en inglés? I'm kidding...¿en español'

updated OCT 28, 2008
posted by Irina
0
votes

¿De que se va a disfrazar'

updated OCT 28, 2008
posted by Sally