give us this day our daily bread

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With Thanksgiving approaching, I am embroidering bread cloths for the thanksgiving meal. I've seen this phrase translated four different ways. One uses the word 'danosio', the other 'cotidiano.'
Which is correct? It is from Matthew 6:11 in the Bible.
Thanks for your help.

8013 views
updated OCT 30, 2008
posted by Kristie

22 Answers

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Thank you Kristie for taking the time to answer my silly question-but I just had to ask.

updated OCT 30, 2008
posted by 00769608
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Yes Gus,
I have an embroidery machine that I can upload designs into and then stitch them out.

Gus said:

What do you mean by program? do you use a computer to desing the patron and then stiched ? 'am just curios

Kristie said:

Okay, I'll make up a couple of samples to upload. I'd like your opinions on them. It'll take me a while to program and stitch, but check back on me tomorrow.I'm a bread baker, and I love to package my delicious, homemade bread beautifully.

>

updated OCT 30, 2008
posted by Kristie
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What do you mean by program? do you use a computer to desing the patron and then stiched ? 'am just curios

Kristie said:

Okay, I'll make up a couple of samples to upload. I'd like your opinions on them. It'll take me a while to program and stitch, but check back on me tomorrow.I'm a bread baker, and I love to package my delicious, homemade bread beautifully.

>

updated OCT 29, 2008
posted by 00769608
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I am beginning a mission work in Honduras. I have made many friends that I want to give gifts to this Christmas. I will be in Honduras from December 1-15.

updated OCT 29, 2008
posted by Kristie
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Kristie said:

I'm a bread baker, and I love to package my delicious, homemade bread beautifully.

Sounds like a good idea, but why did you decide to use Spanish? Are many of your customers Hispanic'

updated OCT 29, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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Okay, I'll make up a couple of samples to upload. I'd like your opinions on them. It'll take me a while to program and stitch, but check back on me tomorrow.
I'm a bread baker, and I love to package my delicious, homemade bread beautifully.

updated OCT 29, 2008
posted by Kristie
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There's more than one correct way, Kristie.

If you want it to sound more formal or old-fashioned, I would use the version Lazarus quoted. For a more contemporary or easy-to-understand version, then one of the others. "Give us this day" actually sounds pretty old-fashioned in English . . . but it's up to you.

Kristie said:

Wow, Natasha,That was a very simple and helpful explanation for a beginner like me. Thank you.How do you think I should state it on my embroidered bread cloths. Since they are gifts, I want them to be correct. The one I have shown was just practice.It is difficult to find embroidered designs in spanish, so I have to make my own.

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updated OCT 29, 2008
posted by Natasha
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I would recommend the "Danos hoy el pan nuestro de cada día" version, which seems to be more modern. But do try and figure out a way to include the accent mark.

And if you decide to sell these online, and get rich, don't forget our commission!

updated OCT 29, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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Wow, Natasha,
That was a very simple and helpful explanation for a beginner like me. Thank you.
How do you think I should state it on my embroidered bread cloths. Since they are gifts, I want them to be correct. The one I have shown was just practice.
It is difficult to find embroidered designs in spanish, so I have to make my own.

updated OCT 29, 2008
posted by Kristie
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Natasha said:

One of the grammar gurus on the forum can tell you the right grammatical name for this, but that's how it works. (And somebody is probably going to say "clitic," but to me they're just pronouns.)

WARNING: unnecessarily technical grammatical jargon below.

A clitic, in Spanish grammar, is not just any pronoun, but an atonic pronoun that can appear both before or after another word; when it appears before a word (normally a verb), they are called proclitic; when they appear after the verb, enclitic.

te = atonic pronoun
ti = tonic pronoun

te doy (proclitic position)
darte (enclitic position)

Notice that the tonic pronoun "ti" cannot appear as a enclitic pronoun (e.g. "darti"), so it is not a clitic.

The word "dánoslo" is called enclitic form for short in Spanish grammars (i.e. a verb with atonic pronouns attached to it).

updated OCT 29, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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You can't find it, because the word you should be looking up is dar (which you already know means to give).

da - imperative (tú) form of dar
nos - us (indirect object pronoun)
lo - it (direct object pronoun)

Needs the accent to keep the stress on the verb, so:

dánoslo - give it to us

One of the grammar gurus on the forum can tell you the right grammatical name for this, but that's how it works. (And somebody is probably going to say "clitic," but to me they're just pronouns.)

Your embroidery is very pretty, by the way.

Kristie said:

I cannot find dánoslo in the dictionary. What does it mean?

>

updated OCT 29, 2008
posted by Natasha
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I cannot find dánoslo in the dictionary. What does it mean?

Natasha said:

Here is Lazarus' version (Reina Valera 1960):[url=http://www.biblegateway.com/passage/'search=Matthew%206:11;&version=60]http://www.biblegateway.com/passage/'search=Matthew%206:11;&ver...[/url];You can change the version to Nueva Versión Internacional or one of the others to see different possibilities.

lazarus1907 said:

When I was younger they use to say it in a different order:El pan nuestro de cadad día, dánoslo hoy.but they have rephrased it to make the Spanish more "contemporary".

>

updated OCT 29, 2008
posted by Kristie
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Here is Lazarus' version (Reina Valera 1960):

[url=http://www.biblegateway.com/passage/'search=Matthew%206:11;&version=60]http://www.biblegateway.com/passage/'search=Matthew%206:11;&version=60[/url];

You can change the version to Nueva Versión Internacional or one of the others to see different possibilities.

lazarus1907 said:

When I was younger they use to say it in a different order:

El pan nuestro de cadad día, dánoslo hoy.

but they have rephrased it to make the Spanish more "contemporary".

>

updated OCT 29, 2008
posted by Natasha
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yes, that is one of the things i have to tweak, my fonts don't support accents, so i need to figure out how to get around that. thanks.
i'm looking for an embroidery design site with sapnish phrases.

updated OCT 28, 2008
posted by Kristie
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Kristie said:

Here is a photo of my first attempt at my bread cloth. I'm going to tweak the design a bit. Thanks for the proper wording.

Don't forget that the word día has an accent on it!

updated OCT 28, 2008
posted by 00bacfba