"had seen" - había visto?

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the sentence is "I wish I had seen the door"

3916 views
updated OCT 28, 2008
posted by wl-wong

13 Answers

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lazarus1907 said:

In Spain its use with "que" is seen as colloquial (in formal writings we omit it), but in many parts of America its presence is considered standard.

Yes, in California and Mexico the que seems to be used most of the time, though not always. In fact, it's hard for me to say ojalá without the que tumbling out on its own.

Incidentally, the Shakira song "Que Vuelvas" includes the following lyrics.

yo quiero que vuelvas
...
yo quiero que regreses

However, the second "que" isn't really pronounced because the beat of the music doesn't have room for it. So it sounds like she is saying "yo quiero regreses." Sounds funny without the que. Great song, though.

updated OCT 28, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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I agree with Lazarus that we have been taught you needed a joiner word (que) in the subjunctive mode. Other exceptions are quizá, quizás, and tal vez (no que is needed.) Quizá vayamos al restaurante Los cuates esta tarde.

updated OCT 28, 2008
posted by ltigo
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Thanks! I didn't realize ojalá was an exception.

lazarus1907 said:

Natasha said:

This might be too broad a question to answer, but then when it is mandatory? I just remember learning, "Don't leave out QUE in Spanish! You need it!"

When you introduce a subordinate clause of any kind, you can't omit "que", except in a very small number cases, and still its suppression is not recommended.

The word "ojalá" is a unique case, because it is an interjection followed by a verb in subjunctive, and it has to be learnt and understood separately. In Spain its use with "que" is seen as colloquial (in formal writings we omit it), but in many parts of America its presence is considered standard. The reason why this "que" is added is maybe because the subjunctive is always introduced by a conjunction (or other similar words), and people are used to constructions like "Quiero que venga", so it is maybe more "logical" for most of them to say "Ojalá que venga" than "Ojalá venga", as if "ojalá" was a verb.

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updated OCT 28, 2008
posted by Natasha
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Natasha said:

This might be too broad a question to answer, but then when it is mandatory? I just remember learning, "Don't leave out QUE in Spanish! You need it!"

When you introduce a subordinate clause of any kind, you can't omit "que", except in a very small number cases, and still its suppression is not recommended.

The word "ojalá" is a unique case, because it is an interjection followed by a verb in subjunctive, and it has to be learnt and understood separately. In Spain its use with "que" is seen as colloquial (in formal writings we omit it), but in many parts of America its presence is considered standard. The reason why this "que" is added is maybe because the subjunctive is always introduced by a conjunction (or other similar words), and people are used to constructions like "Quiero que venga", so it is maybe more "logical" for most of them to say "Ojalá que venga" than "Ojalá venga", as if "ojalá" was a verb.

updated OCT 28, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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Heidita said: The word OJALÁ, which is an interjection derived from Arabic and expresses the strong desire that something would happen, requires the subjunctive.

Heidita said:

Ojalá hubiera visto la puerta.

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updated OCT 28, 2008
posted by Natasha
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the explanation was given in spanish. It's subjunctive preterite. Subjunctive is required by the use of ojalá.

wl wong said:

Thanks everyone!

But can someone tell me why it's hubiera and what tense it is? I haven't seen it before.

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updated OCT 28, 2008
posted by The-Steve
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Past subjunctive of haber.

wl wong said:

Thanks everyone!

But can someone tell me why it's hubiera and what tense it is? I haven't seen it before.

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updated OCT 28, 2008
posted by Natasha
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Thanks everyone!

But can someone tell me why it's hubiera and what tense it is? I haven't seen it before.

updated OCT 28, 2008
posted by wl-wong
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This might be too broad a question to answer, but then when it is mandatory? I just remember learning, "Don't leave out QUE in Spanish! You need it!"

látigo said:

Yes, the que can be optional.

Natasha said:

Is "que" optional in this sentence, then'Ojalá que la hubiera visto.

Heidita said:

Ojalá hubiera visto la puerta.

updated OCT 28, 2008
posted by Natasha
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Yes, the que can be optional.

Natasha said:

Is "que" optional in this sentence, then'Ojalá que la hubiera visto.

Heidita said:

Ojalá hubiera visto la puerta.

updated OCT 28, 2008
posted by ltigo
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Is "que" optional in this sentence, then?

Ojalá que la hubiera visto.

Heidita said:

Ojalá hubiera visto la puerta.

>

updated OCT 28, 2008
posted by Natasha
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Ojalá hubiera visto la puerta.

updated OCT 28, 2008
posted by 00494d19
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Looks good to me, "ojalá había visto la puerta"

updated OCT 28, 2008
posted by Eddy