Espabilar a los suecos

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I recently recieved an email from a client in which the expression 'Espabilar a los suecos' was used. What does it mean? Thanks

2647 views
updated OCT 24, 2008
posted by Adam

9 Answers

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It's probably "despabilar" which basically means wake up. We need the hole sentence here.

updated ENE 14, 2011
posted by 00e657d4
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This saying means that someone else is kind of sleepy or living in a different world (dreaming with little flowers and rainbows), and you have to make a big effort to capt her or his attention.

updated OCT 24, 2008
posted by Marisa-Estrada
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So, what the questioner wants is to get the company where you work to respond to his requests faster.

Adam said:

The company I am working with is Swedish (now that I think of it). I hadn't put two and two together. Mil gracias!

>

updated OCT 23, 2008
posted by 00769608
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The company I am working with is Swedish (now that I think of it). I hadn't put two and two together. Mil gracias!

updated OCT 22, 2008
posted by Adam
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Todas son preguntas indiscretas, por lo que si consideras que no debes contestarlas, no lo hagas, si bien las respuestas me ayudarian a "espabilar" a los suecos'.

Adam, context is not simply helpful it is essential!

All my questions are indiscreet, so, if you consider you should not answer them, don't, but your answers would help me to get those Swedish guys going/moving/be faster/show a reaction....

updated OCT 22, 2008
posted by 00494d19
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Heidita said:

HI Adam, I guess this is part of a sentence, can you give more context? did it have anything to do with Swedish people at all?

Here is the full sentence: ' Todas son preguntas indiscretas, por lo que si consideras que no debes contestarlas, no lo hagas, si bien las respuestas me ayudarian a "espabilar" a los suecos'.

Does that help'

updated OCT 22, 2008
posted by Adam
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In my country "espabílate!" means "pay atention!" when someone is absorbed in a thing different that the one it is being explained. Also when someone needs to put more energy in what he is doing, in soccer for example, the coach could shout "vamos muchachos, espabílense!! if the team look rather lazy. ..

updated OCT 20, 2008
posted by scapeuce
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According to my pequeño Larouse Ilustrado 1983 edition
espabilar is the same as despabilar and it means, echar fuera which means to throw out,
this makes sense with the title of your post
Throw out the Swedish

updated OCT 20, 2008
posted by 00769608
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HI Adam, I guess this is part of a sentence, can you give more context? did it have anything to do with Swedish people at all'

updated OCT 20, 2008
posted by 00494d19